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Billington

Barbara Billington

Science Education Lecturer
PhD in Science Education from University of Minnesota, CEHD;
MEd in Science Education from University of Minnesota, CEHD;
BA in biology from Carleton College.

STEM Education Center
Room 320K LES

1954 Buford Avenue
Tel: 612/626-2471

Office hours:
by appointment.

Areas of Expertise

Gender Equity in STEM Preservice Teachers Beginning Teacher Induction

Barbara has been in academia since her preK days.  Although she never thought she would be a teacher as a child, she found her passion for education while killing countless millions of bacteria and yeast at the University of Chicago and working with scientists of all ages and levels of experience.  After a detour in a fruit fly lab, she earned her life science teaching licensure and taught for seven years as a high school biology teacher.  Subsequently, after a few years of supervising student teachers and organizing the Minnesota State Science Bowl competitions, she returned to graduate school.  Currently she teaches new and beginning science teachers... with a focus on student-centered, culturally relevant, gender-equitable, inquiry-based instruction with a critical feminist pedagogical lens.

Selected Publications

  1. Wang, H. H.; Billington, B. and Chen, Y.C. (2014). STEM in a Hair Accessory: Summer and after-school programs can bring engineering design to underserved communities. Science and Children, 52(3), 3-8.  
     
    This article was awarded the Association of American Publishers Revere Award for feature article in May 2015.
  2. Billington, B.; Britsch, B.; Karl, R.; Carter, S.; Freese, J.; & Regalla, L. (2013). SciGirls Seven: How to Engage Girls in STEM. St. Paul, MN: tpt National Publications.

  3. Billington, B. (2010). SciGirls Seven: How to Engage Girls in STEM. St. Paul, MN: tpt National Publications.
  4. Renaud, H.; Aparicio, O. M.; Zierath, P. D.; Billington, B. L., Chhablani, S. K.; and Gottschling, D. E. (1993). Silent domains are assembled continuously from the telomere and are defined by promoter distance and strength, and by     SIR1 dosage. Genes & Development, 7, pp. 1133-1145.

  5. Aparicio, O. M.; Billington, B. L.; and Gottschling, D. E. (1991).  Modifiers of position effect are shared between telomeric and silent mating-type loci in S. cerevisiae.” Cell, 66, pp. 1279-1287.

  6. Gottschling, D. E.; Aparicio, O. M.;  Billington, B. L. and Zakian, V. A.  (1990). Position effect at S. cerevisiae telomeres: Reversal repression of PolII transcription. Cell, 63, pp. 751-762.

  7. Awad, Omar, et al, eds. (1989). An Australian Mosaic: Forty Young Americans in Capricornia.  Melbourne: Featherwood Press