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Educational Psychology
250 Education Sciences Bldg
56 East River Road
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Voice: 612-624-6083

Educational Psychology
250 Education Sciences Bldg
56 East River Road
Minneapolis, MN
55455-0364 USA

Tel: 612-624-6083
Fax: 612-624-8241
epsy-adm@umn.edu

Jennifer McComas

McComas

Educational Psychology
347 EdSciB
56 East River Rd
Tel:612-624-5854
jmccomas@umn.edu

Ph.D., The University of Iowa

Curriculum Vitae

My research interests include functional analysis of problem behavior in academic and residential settings; basic behavioral processes maintaining desirable and undesirable behavior, such as schedules of reinforcement, stimulus control, and establishing operations; behavioral treatment of problem behavior based on concurrent schedules of reinforcement as well as antecedent stimuli; and analysis of academic performance of students with behavior problems. 

Selected research grants and awards funded (last 5 years)

“Evidence-Based Interventions for Severe Behavior Problems” funded by U.S. Department of Education ($1,000,000) 10/04-10/08 MN PI at Minnesota site (Multi-site grant with Vanderbilt and Virginia Commonwealth University). Collaborators: Symons (MN), Wehby (Vanderbilt), and Sutherland (VCU)

“The Influence of Social Context on Early Aggression” funded by the National Institute of Mental Health ($50,000) Principal Investigator 10/03-10/05

Publications

  1. Lee, R., McComas, J., & Jawar, J. (2002). The effects of differential reinforcement on varied verbal responding by individuals with autism to social questions. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 391-402.

  2. McComas, J. J., Goddard, C., & Hoch, H. (2002). The effects of leisure activities during academic work breaks on task engagement and negatively reinforced destructive behavior. Education and Treatment of Children, 25, 103-112.

  3. Hoch, H., McComas, J. J., Thompson, A. L., & Paone, D. (2002). Concurrent reinforcement schedules: Behavior change and maintenance without extinction. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 155-169.

  4. Hoch, H., McComas, J. J., Johnson, L. A., Faranda, N., & Guenther, S. L. (2002). The effects of magnitude and quality of reinforcement on choice responding during play activities. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 171- 181.

  5. Symons, F. J., Hoch, J., Dahl, N., & McComas, J. J. (2003). Sequential and matching analyses of adaptive and aberrant behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 267-270.

  6. McComas, J. J., Thompson, A., & Johnson, L.A. (2003). The effects of presession attention on problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 297-307.

  7. Murphy, E. S., McSweeney, F. K., Smith, R. G., & McComas, J. J. (2003). Dynamic changes in reinforcer effectiveness: Theoretical, methodological, and practical implications for applied research. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 421-438.

  8. Johnson, L., McComas, J. J., Thompson, A., & Symons, F. J. (2004). Obtained versus programmed reinforcement: Practical considerations in the treatment of escape-reinforced aggression. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 37, 239-242.

  9. McComas, J. J., Johnson, L., & Symons, F. J. (2005) Teacher and peer responsivity to pro-social behavior of high aggressors in preschool. Educational Psychology, 25, 223 - 232.



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Revised November 27, 2013