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Appendix C

State Course Requirements for Graduation with a Regular Diploma

General Requirements

Requirements for Students with Disabilities

Alabama “Close To”: State Defines Alternative Coursework

ELA: English 9(1), English 10(1), English 11(1), and English 12(1); Mathematics (4 credits): Algebra I(1), Geometry(1), Math Elective(1), and Math Elective(1); Science (4 credits): Biology(1), Physical Science(1), Science Elective(1), Science Elective(1); Social Studies (4 credits): Grade 9(1), U.S. History(1), World History(1), Economics(1/2),

Government(1/2); Additional Courses: Physical Education(1), Health Education(1/2), Fine Arts(1/2), Computer Applications(1/2), Additional Electives(5 ½)

Specific additional requirements are listed for the advanced academic endorsement (e.g., advanced courses of the listed courses; for math, advanced algebra with trigonometry included, for science, additional life or physical science; for additional courses, must include two credits in same foreign language).

Noted that Computer Applications can be waived if computer literacy, keyboarding skills, and introductory applications are verified by qualified high school staff (1/2 credit then used for other electives)

See: http://www.aasfaaonline.org/docs/FOCUS/requirements.html

Students with disabilities have specific alternative courses that can be taken to meet the course requirements (e.g., English Essential 9, 10, 11, 12 or AAS English 9, 10, 11, 12 for English 9, 10, 11, 12; Algebraic Essentials A & B and Geometry Essentials A & B or AAS Mathematics 9, 10, 11, 12 for Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II with Trig or Alg II or equivalent))

See: http://alex.state.al.us/ccrs/sites/alex.state.al.us.ccrs/files/Substitute%20Courses%20for%20Students
%20with%20Disabilities%20(SES%20Feb.%2011...).docx
p.1

 

Alaska Same as for All Students

Student must earn 21 credits (and districts may require more), as

follows:

·      Language arts – 4 credits

·      Social studies – 3 credits (must include ½ credit in Alaska history)

·      Math – 2 credits

·      Science – 2 credits

·      Health/Physical Education – 1 credit

See: http://diplomaguide.com/articles/Earning_Your_High_School_Diploma_-_Alaska.html

[Same]

Arizona “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Student must earn 22 credits, as follows:

·      English – 4 credits

·      Math – 4 credits (Alg I, Geometry, Alg II and additional course; Alg II may be modified using a Personal Curriculum)

·      Science – 3 credits

·      Social studies – 3 credits (American History, World History/Geography, ½ government, ½ economics)

·      CTE/Fine Art – 1 credit

·      Electives – 7 credits

See: http://www.azed.gov/hsgraduation/

Graduates are students who have met one of the following requirements to receive a high school diploma: Completed a course of study for high school, and

Passed all three high school AIMS assessments required for graduation (i.e., mathematics, reading, and writing) with or without augmentation. OR Completed an Individual Education Plan (IEP), and Fulfilled the AIMS requirement specified in their IEP. OR Fulfilled all requirements for a Grand Canyon Diploma, and Awarded the Grand Canyon Diploma.

See: http://www.azed.gov/special-education/files/2013/05/graduation-and-students-with-disabilities-parents4.pdf  p.4-5

Arkansas “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Student must earn 22 credits in the SMART CORE curriculum, as follows (unless a waiver is obtained):

·      English – 4 units – grades 9, 10, 11, 12

·      Math – 4 units (math course in grade 11 or 12 and complete Alg II or comparable college course, with a range of specifics for fourth math unit)

·      Natural Science – 3 units with lab experience from physical science, biology, chemistry, applied biology/chemistry, physics or Principles of Technology I and II or PIC Physics)

·      Social studies – 3 units (Civics or Civics/American Government, World History/Geography, American History)

·      Oral Communications – ½ unit

·      Physical Education – ½ unit

·      Health and Safety – ½ unit

·      Fine Art – ½ unit

·      CAREER FOCUS – 6 units, with specifics established through guidance and counseling at the local school district.

A waiver from the SMART CORE can be requested (with cautions about entry into postsecondary). The student is then in the CORE curriculum (16 units).

See: http://www.arkansased.org/public/userfiles/Legal/Legal-Current%20Rules/ade_282_standards
_0709_current.pdf

And http://www.arkansased.org/public/userfiles/Learning_Services/Curriculum%20and%20Instruction/
Smartcore%20Core/smartcore_waiver_2014_080713.pdf

Statements in policy say “For students with disabilities, the Individualized Education Program (IEP) serves as the student’s ‘graduation plan’ (14.04.1) and “…For a student with disabilities, fulfillment of the requirements set forth in the student’s IEP constitutes the basis for graduation from high school” (14.04.2).

See: http://www.arkansased.org/public/userfiles/Legal/Legal-Current%20Rules/ade_282_standards_0709_current.pdf  p.20

California Same as for All Students

 

To receive a high school diploma, students must fulfill state and district graduation requirements. State-mandated graduation course requirements (the state minimums) follow:

Three years of English. Two years of mathematics (including Algebra I)Three years of social science (including U.S. history and geography; world history, culture, and geography; one semester of American government; and one semester of economics) Three years of social science (including U.S. history and geography; world history, culture, and geography; one semester of American government; and one semester of economics)  Two years of science (including biology and physical science)Two years of physical education  One year of foreign language or visual and performing arts.

See: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/hsgrtable.asp

And

The legal authority for special education waivers is:

Education Code Section 56101: (a) Any district, special education local plan area, county office, or public education agency, as defined in Section 56500, may request the board to grant a waiver of any provision of this code or regulations adopted pursuant to that provision if the waiver is necessary or beneficial to the content and implementation of the pupil's individualized education program and does not abrogate any right provided individuals with exceptional needs and their parents or guardians under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. Sec. 1400 et seq.), or to the compliance of a district, special education local plan area, or county office with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. Sec. 1400 et seq.), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. Sec. 794), and federal regulations relating thereto.   

(b) The board may grant, in whole or in part, any request pursuant to subdivision (a) when the facts indicate that failure to do so would hinder implementation of the pupil's individualized education program or compliance by a district, special education local plan area, or county office with federal mandates for a free, appropriate education for children or youth with disabilities.

See: http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/lr/wr/specialedauthority.asp

Do students with disabilities have to complete Algebra I in order to earn a high school diploma?
Yes, students with disabilities have to meet all state and local graduation requirements. Algebra I is a state graduation requirement. Your local school district may require additional math courses. Some students with disabilities, due to the specific nature of their disability, may request a waiver of the Algebra I graduation requirement if, after all support services have been provided, the student cannot pass the course

See: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/algebrafaq.asp

Pursuant to Education Code Section 56101, a district, Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA), county office, or public education agency may request the board to grant a waiver of the Algebra I requirement for individuals with exceptional needs. The district would submit a Specific Waiver to the State Board of Education. Each waiver will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Before submitting a request for a waiver, however, the district, county office or SELPA must ensure that all students/parents/guardians are informed that completion of a course in Algebra I prior to graduation is a requirement for earning a standard high school diploma. Students/parents/guardians must also understand that the consequences of not enrolling in an Algebra I course is the denial of a high school diploma. Information on the waiver process is available from the California Department of Education's (CDE) Waiver Office.

See: http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/se/fp/algebra1.asp

[Same]

 

Colorado Same as for All Students

2.01 (10) A “graduate” is a student who has met the locally defined requirements for a high school diploma. Each local school district’s board of education retains the authority to develop its own high school graduation requirements, so long as those local high school graduation requirements meet or exceed any minimum standards or basic core competencies or skills identified by the Colorado State Board of Education based on skills students will need to be successful after graduation.

See: http://www.sos.state.co.us/CCR/GenerateRulePdf.do?ruleVersionId=2989

And

http://www.cde.state.co.us/postsecondary/graduation-guidelines]

Students must meet one of the competency demonstrations listed by the state. For 2014-15, only assessment based competency demonstrations are provided - no specific coursework criteria are provided.

[Same]

Connecticut “Far From”: Has Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative coursework

11 - High School Requirements (Grades 9-12) Cluster 1: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Total Credit Requirement: 8 Mathematics: Credits Model Curricula Algebra I 1 x, Geometry 1 x, Algebra II or Statistics & Probability 1 x (2) C

See: http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/pressroom/TheConnecticutPlan.pdf

 

Students with a mild or moderate learning disability, who receive the additional support of an Individual Education Plan (IEP), are expected to meet the graduation requirements as stated in this plan. The Planning and Placement Team (PPT) must work closely with the mentor/advisor of the Student Success Plan for each special education student to ensure that every student meets the middle and high school expectations described. There may be some the basic expectations are the same as for assessment environment for this student, but modifications in the curriculum or in the non-special education students.

See: http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/pressroom/TheConnecticutPlan.pdf

Delaware Same as for All Students

505 High School Graduation Requirements and Diplomas  see below:

3.0 Credit Requirements Beginning with the Graduation Class of 2015 (Freshman Class of 2011-2012)      

3.1 For the graduating class of 2015, a public school student shall be granted a State of Delaware Diploma when such student has successfully completed a minimum of twenty four (24) credits in order to graduate including: four (4) credits in English Language Arts, four (4) credits in Mathematics, three (3) credits in Science, three (3) credits in Social Studies, two (2) credits in a World Language, one (1) credit in physical education, one half (1/2) credit in health education, three (3) credits in a Career Pathway, and three and one half (3 ½) credits in elective courses.

3.1.1 The student shall complete mathematics course work that includes no less than the equivalent of the traditional requirements of Geometry, Algebra I and Algebra II courses.      

3.1.2 Scientific investigations related to the State Science Standards shall be included in all three science course requirements.   

3.1.3 During the senior year the student shall maintain a credit load each semester that earns the student at least a majority of credits that could be taken that semester. A credit in Mathematics shall be earned during the senior year.

3.1.3.1 Senior year credits shall include regular high school course offerings, the options available in 8.0, or a combination of both.   

3.2 World Language:    

3.2.1 Students may fulfill the two (2) credit World language requirement by either:

3.2.1.1 Earning a minimum of two (2) World Language credits in the same language or,

3.2.1.2 Demonstrating Novice-high or higher proficiency level on a nationally recognized assessment of language proficiency, except English, in the skill areas of oral or signed expressive and receptive communication, reading and writing, that uses the levels of proficiency as identified by the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Language, or as approved for use by the Delaware Department of Education. 

3.2.2 Any student enrolling in a Delaware public high school from an out-of-state school or nonpublic Delaware high school between and including October 1st of the 11th grade year and September 30th of the 12th grade year with one (1) World Language credit from a previous school shall be required to earn the second credit in that language unless the language is not offered at the enrolling school. In such case, the student shall earn one (1) credit in an additional language for a total of two (2) credits or pursue available options in 8.0 to earn the second credit of the original language.

3.2.3 Any student enrolling in a Delaware public high school from an out-of-state school or nonpublic Delaware high school between and including October 1st of the 11th grade year and September 30th of the 12th grade year with no World Language credits, shall be required to earn at least one (1) World Language credit prior to graduation. Provided further, the minimum twenty-four (24) total credits outlined in this section shall still be met, or any other credit requirements pursuant to 7.1.      

3.2.4 Any student enrolling in a Delaware public high school from an out-of-state school or nonpublic Delaware high school on or after October 1st of the 12th grade year, the World Language requirement shall be waived. Provided further, the minimum twenty-four (24) total credits outlined in this section shall still be met, or any other credit requirements pursuant to 7.1.

3.2.5 Any student transferring between Delaware public schools with one (1) World Language credit from a previous school shall be required to earn the second credit in that language unless the language is not offered at the enrolling school. In such case, the student shall pursue available options in 8.0 to earn the second credit of the original language students or earn one (1) credit in an additional language for a total of two (2) credits….                      

5.0 Student Success Planning (Personalizing the School Experience Through Advisement)          

5.1 Every eighth through twelfth grade student shall have a Student Success Plan (SSP) developed by the student, the student's advisor, and the student's parent(s), guardian(s) or relative caregiver. For a student with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) the Student Success Plan (SSP) shall also incorporate the other aspects of the transition plan required by 14 DE Admin. Code 925

5.2 Each local school district and charter school shall establish an advisement process for developing Student Success Plans which includes the student, the student’s advisor, and the student’s parent(s), guardian(s) or relative caregiver. The advisement process shall include:

5.2.1 Setting learning goals for the student based on academic and career interests and identifying required skills needed, as well as the student’s program of study aligned to the student’s secondary and postsecondary goals;      

5.2.2 Actively monitoring student progress in the Student Success Plan through conferences held with the student and student’s advisor to discuss educational progress and career planning toward life goals on an ongoing basis and, at a minimum, at least once in each marking period; 

5.2.3 Annual review and update of the Student Success Plan by the student, the student's advisor, the student's parent(s) guardian(s) or relative caregiver and others as appropriate to assure alignment of educational progress and career planning toward life goals by the end of each school year;          

5.2.4 Providing support services if a student is in danger of failing a course or is not on track toward completing the entry requirements for his or her post-secondary goals as stated in the SSP; and        

5.2.5 Following the guidelines for Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs of study outlined in the State Plan for Career and Technical Education;           

5.2.6 Reviewing each student’s transcript at the end of the first and second year, and beginning in the 2014-15 school year, at the end of the first, second and third year of high school to determine if the student is on track to graduate based on the following criteria:          

5.2.6.1 At the end of the first year of high school the student has earned at least four (4) core course credits and two (2) other course credits for a total of six (6) course credits;         

TITLE 14 EDUCATION DELAWARE ADMINISTRATIVE CODE 5  

5.2.6.2 At the end of the second year of high school the student has earned at least eight (8) core course credits and four (4) other course credits for a total of twelve (12) course credits; and

5.2.6.3 At the end of the third year of high school the student has earned at least eleven (11) core course credits and seven (7) other course credits for a total of eighteen (18) course credits.          

5.2.6.4 For a student with an Individualized Education Program (IEP), on track to graduate shall be consistent with 5.2.6.1, 5.2.6.2 and 5.2.6.3 unless otherwise determined by the student’s IEP Team….

6.0 Career Pathway       

Local school districts and charter school boards shall establish policies concerning the purpose, content, development, and approval of Career Pathways….

7.0 Additional Credit Requirements District and charter school boards may establish additional credit requirements for graduation above the minimum number of credits required by the Department…..

8.0 Options for Awarding Credit Toward High School Graduation

8.1 District and charter school boards are authorized to award credit toward high school graduation for the following activities, on the condition that the activities incorporate any applicable state content standards. Before awarding credit for any of the following activities, the districts and charter school boards shall have adopted a policy approving the activity for credit and establishing any specific conditions for the award of credit for the activity. Such policy shall be applicable to each school within the district or each charter high school.     

8.1.1 Courses taken at or through an accredited community college, two or four year college.     

8.1.2 Voluntary community service as defined in 14 Del.C. §§8901A and 8902A.

8.1.3 Supervised work experience in the school and the community which meets the educational objectives or special career interest of the individual student.           

8.1.4 Independent study.          

8.1.5 Distance learning courses. These courses may be delivered by the teacher to the learner in real time, online or by video.           

8.1.6 High school courses taken while in the middle school in conjunction with an articulated agreement between the district middle school and the district high school(s). Such credit shall also transfer to a high school in another district or to a charter school 

8.1.7 Course credit transferred from another high school.           

8.1.8 Course credit earned through summer or evening school classes, as a member of the military service or as part of the James H. Groves Adult High School.    

8.1.9 Tutoring programs taught by a teacher certified in the subject being taught.

8.1.10 Course credit awarded by agencies or instrumentalities of the state other than public schools which provide educational services to students. A description of the program provided to the student, grades given, and the number of clock hours of instruction or a demonstration of competency must be provided to the school district or charter school prior to receipt of credit…

See: http://regulations.delaware.gov/AdminCode/title14/500/505.shtml#TopOfPage

[Same]

District of Columbia Same as for All Students

To receive a DCPS diploma, students who enroll in 9th grade for the first time in School Year 2007-2008 and thereafter must earn 24.0 credits (or Carnegie Units) as follows :Art (0.5 credits), Electives (3.5 credits, English (4.0 credits) Health and Physical Education (1.5 credits), Mathematics—including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and Upper Level Math (4.0 Credits), Music (0.5 credits), Science—including Biology, 2 Lab Sciences, and 1 Other Science) (4.0 credits), Social Studies-including World History I & II, DC History, US Government, US History (4.0 credits), World Language (2.0 credits); At least 2.0 credits of the 24.0 required credits must be earned through courses that appear on the approved “College Level or Career Prep” list (AP, IB, CTE courses and college-level courses); 100 hours of Community Service.

See:

http://dcps.dc.gov/DCPS/College+and+Careers/High+School+Planning/Graduation+Requirements

And

The IEP team makes every effort to provide students with the opportunity to earn a regular DCPS diploma. To graduate from high school, a student must complete all necessary requirements for graduation, including receiving passing grades on required coursework, having a good attendance record, completing community service hours and participating in any final testing.

See: http://dcps.dc.gov/DCPS/In+the+Classroom/Special+Education/Plan+for+the+Future/Is+My+Child+
On+Track+to+Graduate%3F

 

[Same]

Florida Same as for All Students

Four options to receive standard diploma:

(1) 24-credit program

All students: 24 credits: 4 ELA; 4 math (may substitute 2 courses, but must take Algebra I & Geometry); 3 science (inc. biology and 2 other equally rigorous courses;  3 social studies; 1 fine or performing arts, speech and debate or practical arts; 1 physical education; 8 electives (must take at least one course online)  Career education courses can be used which will allow student to earn credit in both the career education course and courses required for high school graduation.

(2) 18-credit Academically Challenging Curriculum to Enhance Learning (ACCEL)

See: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&
URL=1000-1099/1002/Sections/1002.3105.html
p.1-2

At a minimum, each school must offer the following ACCEL options: whole-grade and midyear promotion; subject-matter acceleration; virtual instruction in higher grade level subjects; and the Credit Acceleration Program under s. 1003.4295. Additional ACCEL options may include, but are not limited to, enriched science, technology, engineering, and mathematics coursework; enrichment programs; flexible grouping; advanced academic courses; combined classes; self-paced instruction; rigorous industry certifications that are articulated to college credit and approved pursuant to ss. 1003.492 and 1008.44; work-related internships or apprenticeships; curriculum compacting; advanced-content instruction; and telescoping curriculum.

(3) International Bacculaureate (IB) curriculum

 (4) Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) curriculum

See: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&
URL=1000-1099/1002/Sections/1002.3105.html
p.1

And

(11) STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES.—Beginning with students entering grade 9 in the 2014-2015 school year, this subsection applies to a student with a disability.

(a) A parent of the student with a disability shall, in collaboration with the individual education plan (IEP) team during the transition planning process pursuant to s. 1003.5716, declare an intent for the student to graduate from high school with either a standard high school diploma or a certificate of completion. A student with a disability who does not satisfy the standard high school diploma requirements pursuant to this section shall be awarded a certificate of completion.

(b) The following options, in addition to the other options specified in this section, may be used to satisfy the standard high school diploma requirements, as specified in the student’s individual education plan:

1. For a student with a disability for whom the IEP team has determined that the Florida Alternate Assessment is the most appropriate measure of the student’s skills:

a. A combination of course substitutions, assessments, industry certifications, other acceleration options, or occupational completion points appropriate to the student’s unique skills and abilities that meet the criteria established by State Board of Education rule.

b. A portfolio of quantifiable evidence that documents a student’s mastery of academic standards through rigorous metrics established by State Board of Education rule. A portfolio may include, but is not limited to, documentation of work experience, internships, community service, and postsecondary credit.

2. For a student with a disability for whom the IEP team has determined that mastery of academic and employment competencies is the most appropriate way for a student to demonstrate his or her skills:

a. Documented completion of the minimum high school graduation requirements, including the number of course credits prescribed by rules of the State Board of Education.

b. Documented achievement of all annual goals and short-term objectives for academic and employment competencies, industry certifications, and occupational completion points specified in the student’s transition plan. The documentation must be verified by the IEP team.

c. Documented successful employment for the number of hours per week specified in the student’s transition plan, for the equivalent of 1 semester, and payment of a minimum wage in compliance with the requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

d. Documented mastery of the academic and employment competencies, industry certifications, and occupational completion points specified in the student’s transition plan. The documentation must be verified by the IEP team, the employer, and the teacher. The transition plan must be developed and signed by the student, parent, teacher, and employer before placement in employment and must identify the following:

(I) The expected academic and employment competencies, industry certifications, and occupational completion points;

 (II) The criteria for determining and certifying mastery of the competencies;

(III) The work schedule and the minimum number of hours to be worked per week; and

(IV) A description of the supervision to be provided by the school district.

3. Any change to the high school graduation option specified in the student’s IEP must be approved by the parent and is subject to verification for appropriateness by an independent reviewer selected by the parent as provided in s. 1003.572.

(c) A student with a disability who meets the standard high school diploma requirements in this section may defer the receipt of a standard high school diploma if the student:

1. Has an individual education plan that prescribes special education, transition planning, transition services, or related services through age 21; and

2. Is enrolled in accelerated college credit instruction pursuant to s. 1007.27, industry certification courses that lead to college credit, a collegiate high school program, courses necessary to satisfy the Scholar designation requirements, or a structured work-study, internship, or pre apprenticeship program.

(d) A student with a disability who receives a certificate of completion and has an individual education plan that prescribes special education, transition planning, transition services, or related services through 21 years of age may continue to receive the specified instruction and services.

(e) Any waiver of the statewide, standardized assessment requirements by the individual education plan team, pursuant to s. 1008.22(3)(c), must be approved by the parent and is subject to verification for appropriateness by an independent reviewer selected by the parent as provided for in s. 1003.572.

See: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&
URL=1000-1099/1002/Sections/1002.3105.html
p.7

[Same]

 

Georgia “Close To”: State Defines Alternative Coursework

(iii) AREAS OF STUDY.

Units Required

(I) English/Language Arts* 4

(II) Mathematics* 4**

(III) Science* 4  The 4th science unit may be used to meet both the science and elective requirement

(IV) Social Studies* 3

(V) CTAE and/or

Modern Language/Latin and/or Fine Arts 3

(VI) Health and Physical Education* 1

(VII) Electives 4

TOTAL UNITS (MINIMUM) 23

*Required Courses and/or Core Courses

** Students entering ninth grade in 2008-2009, 2009-2010, and 2010-2011 only, who earn credit in Mathematics I and Mathematics II or GPS Algebra and GPS Geometry, along with 2 additional core mathematics courses.

See: https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/State-Board-of-Education/SBOE%20Rules/160-4-2-.48.pdf

Students with Disabilities who earn credit in Mathematics I or GPS Algebra and the associated mathematics support course, and Mathematics II or GPS Geometry and the associated mathematics support course, may upon determination through the Individualized Education Program Team meet mathematics diploma requirements by completing Mathematics III or GPS Advanced Algebra for a total of 3 mathematics core credits. Successful completion of 3 core units of mathematics may not meet the mathematics admission requirements for entrance into a University System of Georgia institution or other post-secondary institution without additional coursework.

See: https://www.gadoe.org/External-Affairs-and-Policy/State-Board-of-Education/SBOE%20Rules/160-4-2-.48.pdf

 

Hawaii Same as for All Students

Effective 2012-13 with the graduating class of 2016, the minimum course and credit requirements to receive a high school graduation diploma are:

CREDITS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
English (note 1) 4 credits
Social Studies (note 2) 4 credits
Mathematics (note 3) 3 credits
Science (note 4) 3 credits

Two credits in one of the specified programs of study:

World Language (same language) (note 5)

Fine Arts (note 6)

Career and Technical Education (note 7)

2 credits
Physical Education (P.E.) 1 credit (note 8)
Health 0.5 credit
Personal Transition Plan 0.5 credit
Electives (Any Subject Area) 6 credits
Senior Project May be counted toward 1.0 elective credit
TOTAL: 24 credits

 

Notes:

English shall include English Language Arts 1 (1 credit), English Language Arts 2 (1 credit) and Expository Writing (0.5 credit).

Social Studies shall include Modern History of Hawaii (0.5 credit) and Participation in a Democracy (0.5 credit).

Math shall include Algebra 1 (1.0 credit), Geometry (1.0 credit) or e.g. two-year integrated Common Core course sequence.

Science shall include Biology (1.0 credit) and Laboratory Science Electives (2.0 credits).

Two credits in a single World Language. Credits must be taken in sequence with consecutive course numbers in the study of one language.

Two credits in a Fine Arts discipline: Visual Arts, Music, Drama or Dance. Credits do not need to be in a single discipline.

Two credits need to be in a single career pathway program of study sequence.

Required courses: PEP 1005 Physical Education Lifetime Fitness (0.5 credit) and Basic Physical Education Elective (0.5 credit).

See: http://www.hawaiipublicschools.org/TeachingAndLearning/StudentLearning/GraduationRequirements/
Pages/Graduation-Requirements-to-2015.aspx

[Same]

Idaho “Far From”: Has Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative coursework

46 credits (29 core of instruction credits; 15 elective credits):

Language Arts (English 8 credits, Speech 1 credit)- 9 credits

Mathematics (including Algebra 1 and Geometry standards) – 6 credits

Science (4 lab) 6 credits

Social Studies (US history, economics, American government) 5 credits

Humanities (interdisciplinary humanities, fine arts or foreign language) 2 credits

Health 1 credit

Electives 17 credits (Elective courses as determined by the school district)

See: https://www.sde.idaho.gov/site/hs_grad_requirements/docs/Grad%20minimum%20Requirements.pdf p.1

 

A. Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team Requirements Regarding Graduation

1. Determine whether the student will meet all state and local requirements to be eligible to graduate from high school and anticipated graduation date.

2. Develop the course of study in collaboration with the Parent Approved Student Learning Plan required for every student prior to the end of eighth (8th) grade. The Student Learning Plan will be reviewed annually and may be revised at any time.

3. Beginning no later than the end of the student’s ninth (9th) grade, review annually the student’s course of study, identify and make changes to the course of study needed for the student to meet graduation requirements and become a contributing member of society.

4. Document any accommodations and adaptations made to the district’s and State’s regular graduation requirements on the student’s behalf.

a. Graduation Requirements with Accommodations. Accommodations to graduation requirements are determined by the IEP team and are deemed necessary for the student to complete graduation requirements. Further:

1) Accommodations to graduation requirements must specifically address completion of the student’s secondary program.

2) Accommodations will maintain the same level of rigor to the district and State graduation requirements. For example, a teacher may use different instructional strategies or alternate methods for assessing the student’s acquisition of skills that are equally rigorous.

3) Accommodations made to any district or State graduation requirement shall be stated in the student’s IEP.

b. Graduation Requirements with Adaptations

Long-term consequences for the student shall be considered when adaptations are made to graduation requirements. Further:

1) Adaptations to graduation requirements shall specifically address completion of the student’s secondary program.

2) Adaptations may alter the level of rigor required in the district or State graduation requirements. Examples of adaptations include changes made to course content, objectives, or grading standard that alter the level of rigor.

3) Adaptations of any district or State graduation requirement shall be stated on the student’s IEP. The team shall discuss with the parents the effect of adaptations on regular education diploma and FAPE.

See: http://www.sde.idaho.gov/specialeducation/docs/Manual/Chapter7.pdf

p.111-112

Illinois “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Core 40 Diploma

Any student who enters high school as a ninth-grader in the 2008-09 school year and beyond will have taken the following minimum number of courses during high school:

• 4 years of language arts;

• 2 years of writing-intensive courses, one year of which must be offered as an English language arts course and may be counted toward meeting one year of the four-year English language arts requirement. The writing courses may be counted toward the fulfillment of other state graduation requirements, when applicable, if writing-intensive content is provided in a subject area other than English language arts;

• 3 years of mathematics, one of which must be Algebra 1 and one of which must include geometry content;

• 2 years of science;

• 2 years of social studies, of which at least one year must be the history of the United States or a combination of the history of the United States and American government; and

• 1 year chosen from any of the following:

o art;

o music;

o foreign language, which shall include American Sign Language; and

o vocational education.

The 2005 changes in the law did not change the flexibility provided in the School Code for students enrolled in vocational and technical education courses. Section 27-22.05 allows these students to “substitute” a related vocational and technical education course for a graduation requirement if that course addresses “at least 50 percent of the content of the required course or graduation requirement for which it is substituted.” The law also requires that the board of education adopt a policy allowing such substitutions, and that a student’s parent or guardian must request the substitution and approve it in writing, using forms developed by the district.

The Indiana General Assembly made completion of Core 40 a graduation requirement for all students beginning with those who entered high school in the fall of 2007. The legislation includes an opt-out provision for parents who determine their students could receive a greater benefit from the General Diploma.

See: http://www.isbe.net/news/pdf/grad_require.pdf p.1

Pursuant to Section 27-22 of the School Code, all students, except students with disabilities whose course of study is determined by an individualized education program, must successfully complete certain courses, depending upon the school year in which they enter the 9th grade and subject to the exceptions provided in Section 1.445 of this Part, as a prerequisite to receiving a high school diploma.

Section 1.445 Required Course Substitute

a) Pursuant to Section 27-22.05 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/27-22.05], school boards in districts with any of the grades 9 through 12 may adopt a policy providing for a course substitution of a vocational and technical course for a high school or graduation requirement. Such policies must provide a complete description of both the vocational and technical course and its relationship to the required course that will be replaced by the substituted course. Courses that may be substituted must meet the requirements set forth in Section 27-22.05 of the School Code and Section 1.440(d) of this Part.

b) No student under the age of 18 shall be enrolled in a course substitution unless that student's parent or guardian first requests the substitution and approves it in writing on forms that the school district makes available for such requests. Such requests shall be maintained in the student's temporary record in accordance with Section 4 of the Illinois School Student Records Act [105 ILCS 10/4].

See: http://www.isbe.net/news/pdf/grad_require.pdf p.12

 

Indiana Same as for All Students

40 credits (i.e., the Core 40)—though there is an opt-out process for students to opt-out of the Core 40

Core 40

English/Language Arts  (must include literature, composition, speech) 8 credits

Mathematics (2 credits Algebra I or Integrated Math I; 2 credits any math course) 4 credits

Science (2 credits Biology I; 2 credits any science course but at least one must be physical science or earth/space science) – 4 credits

Social Studies (including 2 credits US history, 1 credit US Government) 4 credits

Physical Education 2 credits

Health and Wellness 2 credits

College and Career Pathway Courses 6 credits

Flex Credit Courses 5 credits

 Electives 6 credits

See: http://www.doe.in.gov/sites/default/files/curriculum/classof2011general1.pdf

[Same]

 

Iowa “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Iowa Code 256.7(26) states that, beginning with the students in the 2010-2011 school year graduating class, the requirements for high school graduation for students in school districts and accredited nonpublic schools shall include four years of English and language arts, three years of mathematics, three years of science, and three years of social science. Any additional graduation credits or units are locally determined.

See: https://www.educateiowa.gov/graduation-requirements

 

 

Document clearly what the criteria will be for the eligible individual to graduate. Possible criteria are

Graduation based on meeting the same requirements as individuals without disabilities

Graduation based on meeting specified goals as well as completion of a stated number of graduation credits

Satisfactory completion of courses and activities specified in the individual’s IEP.

See: http://www.iowaideainfo.org/vimages/shared/vnews/stories/4a8b1534597fd/Special%20Education%20Procedures
%20Manual%20January%2015%202013%20final.pdf

 p.177

Kansas Same as for All Students

Each local board of education must have a written policy specifying that students are eligible for graduation only upon completion of at least the following requirements:

·   Four units of English language arts, which shall include reading, writing, literature, communication, and grammar. The building administrator may waive up to one unit of this requirement if the administrator determines that a pupil can profit more by taking another subject.

·   Three units of history and government, which shall include world history; United States history; United States government, including the Constitution of the United States; concepts of economics and geography

·   Three units of science, which shall include physical, biological, and earth and space science concepts and which shall include at least one unit as a laboratory course

·   Three units of mathematics, including algebraic and geometric concepts

·   One unit of physical education, which shall include health and which may include safety, first aid, or physiology

·   One unit of fine arts, which may include art, music, dance, theatre, forensics, and other similar studies selected by a local board of education

·   Six units of elective courses

See: http://www.ksde.org/Portals/0/TLA/Graduation%20and%20School%20Choice/Graduation%20and%20
Dropout/Kansas%20Graduation%20Requirements%20Fact%20Sheet%202014-2015.pdf
  p.1

[Same]

Kentucky “Close To”: District Defines Alternative Coursework

22    Credits total:

(1) Language arts - four (4) credits (English I, II, III, and IV) to include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for English and language arts and comply with the following: 

(a) Language arts shall be taken each year of high school; and (b) If a student does not meet the college readiness benchmarks for English and language arts as established by the Council on Postsecondary Education in 13 KAR 2:020, the student shall take an English and language arts transitional course or intervention, which is monitored to address remediation needs, before exiting high school;  

(2) Social studies - three (3) credits to include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for social studies;

(3) Mathematics - three (3) credits to include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for mathematics and include the following minimum requirements:

(a) Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. An integrated, applied, interdisciplinary, occupational, or technical course that prepares a student for a career path based on the student's individual learning plan may be substituted for a traditional Algebra I, Geometry, or Algebra II course on an individual student basis if the course meets the content standards in the Kentucky core academic standards, incorporated by reference in 704 KAR 3:303;

(b) A mathematics course or its equivalent as determined by the district shall be taken each year of high school to ensure readiness for postsecondary education or the workforce;

(c) Any mathematics course other than Algebra I, Geometry, or Algebra II shall be counted as an elective; and

(d) If a student does not meet the college readiness benchmarks for mathematics as established by the Council on Postsecondary Education in 13 KAR 2:020, the student shall take a mathematics transitional course or intervention, which is monitored to address remediation needs, before exiting high school;

(4) Science - three (3) credits that shall incorporate lab-based scientific investigation experiences and include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for science; (5) Health - one-half (1/2) credit to include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for health; (6) Physical education - one-half (1/2) credit to include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for physical education;

(7) History and appreciation of visual and performing arts (or another arts course which incorporates this content) - one (1) credit to include the content contained in the Kentucky core academic standards for arts and humanities or a standards-based specialized arts course based on the student’s individual learning plan;

(8) Academic and career interest standards-based learning experiences - seven (7) credits including four (4) standards-based learning experiences in an academic or career interest based on the student’s individual learning plan; and

(9) Demonstrated performance-based competency in technology.

Section 3. (1) A local board of education may substitute an integrated, applied, interdisciplinary, occupational, technical, or higher level course for a required course if the alternative course provides rigorous content and addresses the same applicable components of 703 KAR 4:060.

See: http://education.ky.gov/educational/AL/Documents/305.doc

(2)   For students with disabilities, a local board of education may substitute a functional, integrated, applied, interdisciplinary, occupational, technical, or higher level course for a required course if the alternative course provides rigorous content and addresses the same applicable components of 703 KAR 4:060. These shall be based on grade-level content standards and may be modified to allow for a narrower breadth, depth, or complexity of the general grade-level content standards.

 

See: http://education.ky.gov/educational/AL/Documents/305.doc, p.2

Louisiana Same as for All Students

 

 

 

College and Career Diploma

Career Diploma

Subject Area

LA Core 4

Basic

Career

English

4

Math

4

Phy Ed

1.5

Health

.5

Science

4

3

3

Social Studies

4

3

3

Foreign Lang

2

-

-

Arts

1

-

-

Electives

3

8 (6 credits in career area of concentration)

7 (all 7 credits in career area of concentration)

Total credits

24

24

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See: http://www.louisianabelieves.com/academics/graduation-requirements

[Same]

Maine “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

NEPN/NSBA Code:  IKF:  I.DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS GRADUATING IN THE CLASSES OF 2014, 2015, 2016 OR 2017   Students who anticipate graduating in the Classes of 2014, 2015, 2016, or 2017 must meet the following minimum requirements in order to be awarded a high school diploma.

A. The student must successfully complete a total of ______ credits.  Of these credits, 12 ½ (twelve and one-half) must be those specified by the State of Maine.  They are:1.English/language arts – 4 credits; 2.Mathematics – 2 credits; 3.Social studies and history, including one year of American history and government – 2 credits; 4.Science, including at least one year of laboratory study – 2 years; 5.Fine arts, which may include art, music, forensics or drama – 1 credit; 6.Health – 1/2 credit; and 7.Physical education – 1 credit.

B. The student must demonstrate computer skills according to the school unit’s standards for computer literacy, proficiency, and performance.

C. In addition to the State requirements, the student must meet the following additional credit requirements established by the Board: 1. Math – _______ additional credit(s); 2. Science – _______ additional credit(s); 3. [Other Area of Study, e.g., World History] – _______ credit(s); 4. [Other Area of Study] – ______credit(s); 5. [Senior portfolio, senior exhibition, “capstone” experience or other specific local requirement – ______ credit(s)].

D. The remaining credits may be selected by the student based on his/her interest, satisfaction of course prerequisites, and requirements of the field that he/she plans to enter upon graduation.

E. [OPTIONAL:  The student must also satisfactorily complete a total of _______ community service hours.]

See: http://www.maine.gov/doe/proficiency/policy/msmasamplepolicyIKF-2013.doc p.2

Children with disabilities, as defined in section 7001, subsection 1-A, who successfully meet the content standards of the system of learning results in addition to any other diploma requirements applicable to all secondary school students, as specified by the goals and objectives of their individualized education plans, may be awarded a high school diploma. Career and technical students may, with the approval of the commissioner, satisfy the 2nd-year math and science, the 2nd-year social studies and the fine arts requirements of subsection 2 through separate or integrated study within the career and technical school curriculum.

See: http://www.maine.gov/education/disruption/law.html

 

Maryland Same as for All Students

To be awarded a diploma, a student shall be enrolled in a Maryland public school and have earned a minimum of 21 credits that include the following:

English 4 credits,

Mathematics 3 credits: 1 in Algebra/Data Analysis, 1 in Geometry, & 1 additional mathematics credit.

Science 3 credits 1 in Biology, 2 that must include laboratory experience in any or all of the following areas: earth science, life science, physical science.

Social Studies: 3 credits: US History, World History, Local, State, and National Government.

See: http://hsaexam.org/img/HS_Grad_Req.pdf

Can a student complete high school graduation requirements by attending an accredited college or approved vocational, technical or other postsecondary school program?

Yes. A student may receive a Maryland High School Diploma through acceptance in the early college admission program when:

o  All Maryland High School Assessment and student service learning requirements have been met; and A written request by the student and parent or guardian is made to and approved by the local superintendent of schools; and

o  The student’s program for the first year of college is approved by the local superintendent of schools if this program is included toward the issuance of a diploma; and

o  At the conclusion of the first year of study, a written request and a transcript is submitted to the local superintendent requesting a Maryland High School Diploma. (COMAR 13A.03.02.10 Alternatives to 4-Year Enrollment) Other Requirements: Fine Arts, 1 credit, Physical Education, 1/2 credit, Health, 1/2 credit, Technology Education, 1 credit, Other 2 credits of foreign language or 2 credits of American Sign Language or 2 credits of advanced technology ed and 3 credits in electives Or 4 credits by successfully completing a State-approved career & technology program and 1 credit in an elective. Students must also meet attendance, service-learning, and any local school system requirements. Updated 2/27/2013

Can high school credits be earned in ways other than going to school during regular days/year? Can online courses be accepted for credit by a school? Is there a criterion by which these courses are evaluated?

For students currently enrolled in a Maryland public school, credit can only be awarded for MSDE-approved online courses. See COMAR 13A.03.02.05D. Correspondence and Online Courses. An online course is a course provided through the Internet and other technologies in which 80% or more of the instruction is conducted online with the teacher and student separated by distance or time or both and in which two-way communication between the teacher and student is required. For online courses, COMAR 13A.03.02.05D(1) specifies that “Consistent with local school system policy and procedure, credit may be given…for Department-approved online courses. If credit is to be applied toward minimum graduation requirements, the…Department-approved online course shall be provided by the local school system.”

The State Department of Education has developed an approval process for online courses that are administered by a local school system. This approval process helps ensure the quality of the online courses offered by our public schools and ensures that such courses align with state content standards and core learning goals. A list of MSDE-approved online courses is updated periodically and available on the MVLO website at http://www.mdk12online.org.

Yes. See COMAR 13A.03.02.05 Other Provisions for Earning Credit. Can a student earn a Maryland High School Diploma online?

No. The Maryland Virtual Learning Opportunity (MVLO) program has a state-run virtual school project, Maryland Virtual School (MVS) that is managed by MSDE. MVS is primarily used for supplemental instruction. Students cannot earn a high school diploma by solely completing online courses. MVS does not offer a high school diploma online. The majority of students served take one or two online courses to supplement their traditional school program. Enrollment in MVS online courses requires local school system approval.

See: http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/EDA7F17C-52FD-48E7-99B6
-9126DCB53CB8/35115/MD_HighSchoolGradCourseReq_byCounty_03012013_.pdf

http://hsaexam.org/img/HS_Grad_Q_A.pdf  p.3-12

And

What are the graduation credit requirements for students with disabilities who are placed in non-public schools?

The answer to this question was the subject of a memo to local school superintendents from Former Superintendent, Dr. Grasmick dated November 14, 2005 regarding Graduation Requirements for Students in Non-Public Placements. State regulations address disparities between local school system graduation requirements and those of non-public special education schools. COMAR 13A.03.02.08B requires students in a non-public special education school to meet the graduation requirements of the placing local school system. There are alternative ways to do so. COMAR 13A.03.02.11 provides local school systems with an opportunity to develop “alternative ways for individuals or groups of students to fulfill graduation requirements.” Local school systems can work with the non-public school to agree on a curricular program that meets the instructional needs of the student and addresses the normal content specified generally in the local school system’s graduation requirements. The curricular program for these students can include fewer than the requisite number of credits in the local school system graduation requirements, but no fewer than the state minimum of 21 credits as identified in COMAR 13A.03.02-.04A. The student must also meet the service learning requirement, and he or she must take and pass the Maryland High School Assessments as appropriate to the date of entry into grade 9 or satisfy the HSA graduation requirement by achieving the required combined score or successfully complete the Bridge Plan for Academic Validation (see section on High School Assessments).

See: http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/EDA7F17C-52FD-48E7-99B6
-9126DCB53CB8/35115/MD_HighSchoolGradCourseReq_byCounty_03012013_.pdf

http://hsaexam.org/img/HS_Grad_Q_A.pdf  p.2

[Same]

Massachusetts Same as for All Students

The Massachusetts Education Reform Law of 1993, state law, G.L. c. 69, § 1D, requires that all students who are seeking to earn a high school diploma, including students educated at public expense in educational collaboratives and approved and unapproved private special education schools within and outside the state, must meet the Competency Determination (CD) standard, in addition to meeting all local graduation requirements. On July 2, 2012, an exception to the graduation requirement expired for students who were originally in the class of 2009 or an earlier class and meet certain criteria. In May 2011 the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education voted to delay the history and social science requirement for a CD until the third consecutive year that the history and social science assessment is administered. At least through the class of 2018 (this year's eighth graders), students in high school will continue to take MCAS tests to meet the CD requirement. Any changes to the CD requirement will be determined at a later time.

See: http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/graduation.html

[Same]

Michigan “Far From”: Has Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative coursework

Requires 16 credits (18 for class of 2016)

·   ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 4 Credits: English Language Arts 9, English Language Arts 10, English Language Arts 11, English Language Arts 12,

·   MATHEMATICS 4 Credits: Geometry, Algebra I, Algebra II, one math or math-related course in final year of high school 3 Credits –

·   SCIENCE: Biology, Chemistry or Physics, one additional science credit

·   World History & Geography, U.S. History & Geography, .5 credits in both Civics and Economics 1 Credit –

·   PHYSICAL EDUCATION & HEALTH: 1 Credit

·   VISUAL, PERFORMING and APPLIED ARTS ONLINE LEARNING EXPERIENCE 2 Credits - (world lang for class of 2016 and after)

·   LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH

·   In grades 9-12; OR an equivalent learning experience in grades K-12 (beginning with students entering 3rd grade in 2006.) Formal coursework OR an equivalent learning experience in grades K-12 (2 credits); Or

·   Formal coursework or an equivalent learning experience in grades (1 credit) and completion of a department approved formal career and technical education program or an additional visual, performing and applied arts credit (1 credit)

See: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/New_MMC_one_pager_11.15.06_183755_7.pdf  p.2

Q: Can a student required to take the MMC waive the state’s physical education or health credit requirement for any reason?

A: Yes, under certain conditions. The Michigan Merit Curriculum MCL 380.1278b, allows a student to substitute one physical education and health credit to acquire extra English language arts, mathematics, science or world language credits, if a student has an approved personal curriculum. In addition, students may test out of any state-required graduation credit if the student earns:

1) a qualifying score, as determined by the department, on the assessments developed or selected for the subject area by the department or

2) the student earns a qualifying score, as determined by the school district or public school academy, on one or more assessments developed or selected by the school district or public school academy that measure a student’s proficiency in the content expectations or guidelines that apply to the credit.

See: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Complete_MMC_FAQ_August_2014_467323_7.pdf p.11

The personal curriculum should be designed to lead to a diploma, incorporating as much of the MMC as is practicable for the individual student while maintaining the rigor of the MMC and the integrity of the diploma. Should a student fail to meet the requirements of the personal curriculum, the PC will be considered null and void, and the student will be responsible for meeting all standard requirements of the MMC in order to receive a diploma.

See: https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/PC_FAQs_5_12_09_277981_7.pdf

p.13

No modification except for students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and for transfer students who have completed 2 years of high school.

Q: Are special education students required to complete the Michigan Merit Curriculum? A: Special Education students are general education students first, and by law, must be given access to, and support for success in, the general curriculum. Studies show all students learn and achieve more when they take a challenging curriculum rather than low-level courses. All students receiving special education services in Michigan must have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) that details the appropriate education plan outlining modifications, accommodations, and support for student success. In addition, the law allows a parent or legal guardian to request a personal curriculum for the student that modifies some of the Michigan Merit Curriculum requirements.

See: https://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/Parent_12.20.06_181524_7.pdf

Modifications Not Allowed: There are no modifications to credit requirements allowed in the following areas (exceptions may apply for students with an IEP or transfer students):English language arts• Science• World languages• Civics/Government• Online learning experience• Modification restrictions are intended to protect the futures of students by ensuring that the personal curriculum option is not used as a convenient escape door for schools to shy away from providing access to the MMC for students who are more difficult to reach and teach.

See: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mde/PC_Guide_Final_5_12_09_277958_7.pdf  p.8

 

Minnesota “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Minnesota students are required to complete three kinds of requirements by the time they graduate. Students must: Satisfactorily complete the state course credit requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.024. Satisfactorily complete all state academic standards or local academic standards where state standards do not apply. Meet graduation assessment requirements. Course Credits Students complete the academic standards by taking a core course of study that equips them with the knowledge and skills they need for success in postsecondary education, highly skilled work, and civic life. In order to graduate, your child’s high school coursework must include at least the minimum state course credit requirements. A course credit is equivalent to a student successfully completing an academic year of study or mastering the subject matter, as determined by the local school district.

Students must complete a minimum of 21.5 course credits as follows:

4 credits of language arts

3 credits of mathematics, including algebra, geometry, statistics and probability sufficient to satisfy the standards. Students in the graduating class of 2015 and beyond must complete an algebra II credit or its equivalent as part of the 3-credit requirement. In addition to the high school credits, students in the graduating class of 2015 and beyond must also complete an algebra I credit by the end of eighth grade.

3 credits of science, including a biology credit. In addition, students in the graduating class of 2015 and beyond must complete a chemistry, physics, or Career and Technical Education (CTE) credit as part of the 3-credit requirement. (The CTE credit must meet the standards underlying the chemistry or physics credit.)

3½ credits of social studies, including U.S. history, geography, government and citizenship, world history and economics.

1 credit in the arts,

7 elective credits. An agriculture course may fulfill a general science credit requirement. A CTE course may fulfill a general science, mathematics, or arts credit requirement. School districts may require additional course credits or other requirements for graduation beyond the minimum required by the state.

See: http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/StuSuc/GradReq/

Question 8: When is it appropriate for a student with a disability to receive a diploma based on attainment of IEP objectives, and who should make this decision? Answer: The student’s IEP team, including the parent(s), is charged, in part, with determining appropriate placement, accommodations, modifications, services, goals, objectives, transition goals, objectives, and services for that student. In making these determinations, the IEP team also considers whether the student is able to take the examinations required or fulfill all of the requirements necessary for graduation in Minnesota, with or without modification. For some students, the IEP team may decide that attainment of individualized objectives is a more appropriate determining factor, with respect to receipt of a high school diploma, than is attainment of required examinations or other requirements. The IEP team, because of its unique knowledge of and work with the student, is best suited to make this determination. The student’s parent must consent to the proposed change of placement prior to exiting the student.

See: http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/SchSup/ComplAssist/QA/GradTransTransf/046628

 

Mississippi Same as for All Students

Minimum 24 Carnegie units specified below unless parent/guardian opts out. Beginning school year 2008-2009 and thereafter, all entering ninth graders (seniors of school year 2011-2012 and later) will be required to have a minimum of 24 Carnegie units as specified below, unless their parent/guardian requests to opt the student out of Appendix A-3 requirements. Any student who is taken out of these requirements of Appendix A-3 will be required to complete the graduation requirements as specified in Appendix A-2. The local school district may establish additional local requirements approved by the local school board as authorized under MS Code 37-16-7.

English, 4 units, English II required,

Math 4 units Algebra I required,

Science, 4 units, Biology 1 required,

Social Studies, 4 units, Required subjects are: World History (1), U.S. History(1), Geography(.5), U.S. Government(.5), Economics(.5), Mississippi Studies(.5).

Health & Physical Education, 1 unit, required: Comprehensive Health(.5) or Family and Individual Health(.5) and Physical Education (.5),

Business & Technology, 1 unit, rquired: 1 Computer Discovery or .5 Keyboarding and .5 Computer Applications,

The Arts, 1 unit, any approved 500.000 course or completion of the 2 course sequence for Computer Graphics Technology I and II, Electives, 5 units.

2 Compensatory Mathematics and any developmental mathematics course may not be included in the four mathematics courses required for graduation; however, these courses may be included in the 5½ general electives required for graduation. Students are prohibited from taking Pre-Algebra or any other lower level math after successfully completing Algebra I. One of the four required mathematics units may be in Drafting if the student completes the 2-course sequence for Drafting I & II. Beginning school year 2007-2008 for all entering eighth graders, at least two of the four required mathematics courses must be higher than Algebra I. Effective with the eighth graders of 2008-2009, Pre-Algebra and Transition to Algebra may not be taken after a student completes Algebra I. The allowable mathematics courses that can be taken which are higher than Algebra I are: Geometry, Algebra II, Advanced Algebra, Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, Discrete Mathematics, Statistics, and AP Statistics. Effective with the eighth graders of 2004-2005, Pre-Algebra, Transition to Algebra, and Algebra I, may be taken in the eighth grade for Carnegie unit credit. Effective with the eighth graders of 2008-2009, Geometry may be taken in the eighth grade for Carnegie unit credit.

3 One unit may be in Introduction to Agriscience, Concepts of Agriscience, Science of Agricultural Plants, Science of Agricultural Animals, or Science of Agricultural Environment. Two units may be in the following courses if the student completes the 2-course sequence: Agriscience I & II; Allied Health I & II; Aquaculture I & II; Forestry I & II; Horticulture I & II; Plastics and Polymer Science I & II; and Technology Applications I & II. Two units may be earned by completing the AEST 3-course sequence: one unit in Concepts of Agriscience; one unit in Science of Agricultural Animals or Science of Agricultural Plants, or Science of Agricultural Environment; and one unit in Agribusiness and Entrepreneurship. Beginning school year 2008-2009 for all entering eight graders, one unit must be a lab-based physical science. The allowable lab-based physical science courses are Physical Science, Chemistry I, Chemistry II, AP Chemistry, Physics I, Physics II, AP Physics B, AP Physics C – Electricity and Magnetism, and AP Physics C – Mechanics.

4 The credit earned for a State/Local Government course in any other state by an out-of-state transfer stu-dent who enters after the sophomore year can stand in lieu of Mississippi Studies or Mississippi State and Local Government. If the transfer student took a State/Local Government course in a grade level that did not award Carnegie unit credit, then any other ½ unit social studies course may be accepted. An out-of-state student who transfers after the junior year may substitute any other ½ unit social studies course.

5 Credit earned in Allied Health I/Health Science I may be accepted in lieu of Comprehensive Health or Family and Individual Health to meet the graduation requirement for ½ Carnegie unit in Health.

6 Evidence of proficiency in Keyboarding and Computer Applications is accepted in lieu of the required courses if the student earns one unit in any of the courses listed in the Business and Technology Framework (academic and vocational).

7 Carnegie units (up to one each school year) in physical education may be received from participation in interscholastic athletic activities, band, and ROTC if they meet the instructional requirements specified in the Fitness through Physical Education Framework. Interscholastic athletic activities used for Carnegie unit credit must be sanctioned by the Mississippi High School Activities Association.

See: http://gearupms.org/docs/GraduationRequirements.pdf

p.1-2

[Same]

Missouri “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Requires 24 credits:

Communication Arts, 4 cr,

Social Studies, 3 credits,

Math, 3 credits,

Science, 3 credits,

Fine arts, 1 credit,

Practical Arts, 1 credit,

Phy Ed, 1 credit,

Health Education .5 credit,

Personal Finance (can be .5 credit with 7 credits of electives, OR be .5 of the social studies credit witih 7.5 elective credits, OR can be .5 of Practical Arts credit with 7.5 elective credits) [3 options on how to combine personal finance in]

Virtual Education--Courses Delivered Through Electronic Media ….

Credit for Off-Campus Instruction

Under some circumstances, students may earn high school credit for off-campus learning experiences. (See Appendix E for a description of the conditions and limitations.)

Dual Credit for High School and College Courses Students may earn both high school and college credit for some coursework under some circumstances. Generally, such arrangements fall into two types: (1) arrangements in which advanced high school courses are taught on the high school campus by teachers designated as adjunct instructors by a college or university; and (2) arrangements in which high school students leave the high school campus and attend regular college classes for part of the school day. (See Appendix E for a description of the conditions and limitations.)  9 DESE 3341-53 1/07

Credit for Off-Campus Instruction Under some circumstances, students may earn high school credit for off-campus learning experiences. (See Appendix E for a description of the conditions and limitations.) Dual Credit for High School and College Courses Students may earn both high school and college credit for some coursework under some circumstances. Generally, such arrangements fall into two types: (1) arrangements in which advanced high school courses are taught on the high school campus by teachers designated as adjunct instructors by a college or university; and (2) arrangements in which high school students leave the high school campus and attend regular college classes for part of the school day. (See Appendix E for a description of the conditions and limitations.)

Embedded Credit School districts may choose to embed competencies from one subject into another class and award credit to students for both the embedded content and the other subject. School districts need to approach the issue of embedded credit with caution. The embedded subject and the other subject should be closely linked. For example, embedding mathematics credit in a building trades class seems a natural fit. Embedding personal finance content into a family and consumer science class is an appropriate link.

Because this involves an alternative method for granting credit, school districts choosing to offer embedded credit must notify DESE. The notification must include assurances that the embedded content is closely aligned to the subject in which that content will be taught. The embedded content must also align closely to the Missouri Show-Me Standards and Grade Level Expectations, and be rigorous in expectations. The district assurances must also include a plan for determining student competency in the embedded credit as well the acceptable level of student mastery for the awarding of credit. Area Career Centers should collaborate with their sending school districts as core curriculum is embedded into career education classes. That collaboration must involve administrators and classroom teachers of the affected content areas. The collaboration must also include the development of the plan to determine student competency. Districts may wish to consult the Embedded Credit Tool kit developed by the Missouri Career Education Center at University of Central Missouri for detailed processes for embedding credit in career education classes. (http://missouricareereducation.org/)

Competency-Based Credit

School districts may award high school cred it to students upon demonstration of mastery of the competencies for a particular course. School districts wishing to award credit based on 10 DESE 3341-53 1/07 demonstration of a mastery of the course competencies must notify DESE. School districts must assure that the expected level of performance would demonstrate that a student has mastered the course competencies and may receive credit for the class. Waiver of Required Academic

Credit for Students Completing a Career and Technical Program of Studies Local board of education policy may permit a waiver of one unit of academic credit (communication arts, mathematics, science, or social studies) for students who complete a three-unit career and technical education program of studies. The three-unit career and technical program must constitute a planned program leading to specific career-related competencies, not simply any three units of credit. The academic subject in which the waiver is granted must be one in which the student has received substantial instruction in the career and technical education program. For example, students completing a three-unit agricultural-education program or a health-sciences program might be permitted to waive one unit of science; students completing a three-unit electricity/electronics program might be permitted to waive one unit of mathematics. Alternative, Performance-Based Graduation Educators and others have recognized that completing a specified number of units of credit may not ensure that students will obtain the knowledge, competencies and skills that are considered essential to success in postsecondary studies or on the job. The State Board of Education has authorized the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to waive the standard graduation requirements for school districts that wish to develop and implement performance-based graduation standards as an alternative to the credit-based requirements. Any school district interested in this alternative should contact the School Improvement and Accreditation Section for information and guidance in developing such a system. Credit Recovery Credit recovery provides an opportunity for high school students (grades 9-12) who would otherwise fail a course to complete the requirements of the class. The content teacher must outline the deficiencies the student must correct in order to receive credit for the class. The credit recovery teacher acts as a monitor (resource teacher) to students as they work to complete the required coursework. Since students in the class may be working in a variety of subject areas, the supervising teacher may hold any valid Missouri teacher certificate except a substitute certificate, early childhood certificate, or non-degree vocational certificate.   11 DESE 3341-53 1/07

Credit for Alternative Arrangements

Some students cannot schedule within the regular school day all the courses they wish to take and, therefore, take some courses under special arrangements such as “Zero Hour,” evening community education programs, centers for at-risk youth, or summer-school programs. Other students are unable to succeed in conventional high school instruction and pursue secondary programs in alternative settings. Local boards of education may, by policy, recognize high

school credit for such classes if: 1) the instructors hold valid teaching certificates; 2) the course content and performance standards

have been reviewed and determined by the staff of the local high school to be equivalent to corresponding high school courses; and 3) the instructional time is reasonably equated to the stat e standard for the Carnegie Unit for purposes of granting units of credit.

See: http://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/Graduation_Handbook_2010.pdf

p.5-11

2. Students with disabilities will receive grades and have credit transcripted in the same manner as all other students when they complete the same courses as other students. 3. Students with disabilities who complete regular courses modified as indicated in their IEPs will receive grades and have credit transcripted in the same manner as students who complete the courses without modification. The fact that the courses were modified maybe noted on the transcript. 4. Students with disabilities who meet the goals and objectives of their IEPs, as measured by the evaluation procedures and criteria specified in the IEPs, will have credit transcripted in accordance with the state definition of units of credit.

See: http://dese.mo.gov/sites/default/files/Graduation_Handbook_2010.pdf

p.16-17

 

Montana “Close To”: District Defines Alternative Coursework

10.55.905 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

(1) As a minimum, a school district’s requirements for graduation shall include a total of 20 units of study that enable all students to meet the content and performance standards.

(2) In order to meet the content and performance standards, the following 13 units shall be part of the 20 units required for all students to graduate:

(a) 4 units of English language arts;

(b) 2 units of mathematics;

(c) 2 units of social studies;

(d) 2 units of science;

(e) 1 unit of health enhancement, with 1/2 unit each year for two years;

(f) 1 unit of arts;

(g) 1 unit of vocational/ technical education.

(3) Units of credit earned in any Montana high school accredited by the board of public education shall be accepted by all Montana high schools.

(4) In accordance with the policies of the local board of trustees, students may be graduated from high school with less than four years enrollment.

10.55.906 HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT

(1) A high school shall require a minimum of 20 units of credit for graduation, including ninth grade units. A unit of credit shall begiven for satisfactory completion of a full-unit course.

(a) A unit of credit is defined as the equivalent of at least 225 minutes per week for one year.

(b) Passage of time between classes may be counted toward the standard school day but shall not be counted toward class time.

(2) A student who is unable to attend class for the required amount of time may be given fractional credit for partial completion of a course, with the local administrator’s permission.

(3) Each governing authority may waive specific course requirements based on individual student needs and performance levels. Waiver requests shall also be considered with respect to age, maturity, interest, and aspirations of the students and shall be in consultation with the parents or guardians.

(4) With the permission of the school district trustees, a student may be given credit for a course satisfactorily completed in a period of time shorter or longer than normally required and, provided that the course meets the district’s curriculum and assessment requirements, which are aligned with the content and performance standards stated in the education program. Examples of possible acceptable course work include correspondence and extension courses, distance learning courses, adult education, summer school, work study, specially designed courses and challenges to current courses. Any acceptable program must be consistent with local board policy.

(a) Any Montana high school shall accept such units of credit taken with the approval of the accredited Montana high school in which the student was then enrolled and which appear on the student’s official transcript.

See: http://opi.mt.gov/GetAnswers/questions/130/What+is+required+for+grades
+k-12+in+montana%3B+subjects+activities%3F

15. May requirements for granting a diploma be waived for students with disabilities? Each school district shall provide for a waiver of the district established learner outcomes in order to accommodate the needs of special education students. Learner outcomes that are waived must be identified on the student’s IEP.

The school district is permitted to waive specific course requirements based on individual student needs and performance levels. Waiver requests shall be considered with respect to age, maturity, interest, and aspirations of the student and shall be in consultation with the student’s parents or guardians. The IEP team must follow local district policy when considering waivers for students with disabilities.

See: http://opi.mt.gov/pdf/speced/Guides/GradesGradDipl.pdf

p.6

Nebraska “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

The State Board of Education adopted specific graduation requirements that include 40 credit hours of language arts and 30 credit hours each of mathematics, science, and social studies/history (See Rule 10003.05). By the 201415 School Year, districts are to adopt and implement graduation requirements that meet the highest level of rigor of the standards specified in the state standards set forth in the appendices of Chapter 10. This requirement will begin with eighth graders enrolled during the current 201011 school year.

See: http://www.education.ne.gov/APAC/Documents/CurrentEvents/GraduationRequirements.pdf

003.05 Graduation Requirements. Each high school shall require from grades nine through twelve at least 200 credit hours for graduation, for which at least 80 percent shall be from the core curriculum. The number of credit hours given for a course may be less than the number of instructional units and may be increased up to 25 percent above the number of instructional units.

003.05A By the 2014-15 school year, school districts shall adopt and implement graduation requirements that meet the highest level of rigor of the standards as specified in the state standards set forth in the appendices of this Chapter, including, but not limited to the following:

003.05A1 Language Arts. Forty credit hours of Language Arts with course content that includes composition, verbal communication, literature, research skills, and technical reading and writing.

003.05A2 Mathematics. Thirty credit hours of mathematics with course content that includes algebraic, geometric, data analysis, and probability concepts.

003.05A3 Science. Thirty credit hours of science with course content that includes biological, earth/space, and physical science concepts with corresponding science inquiry skills and laboratory experience.

003.05A4 Social Studies/History. Thirty credit hours of social studies/history with course content that includes civics/government, geography, United States and world history, and economic concepts.

003.05B School systems may adopt a policy allowing high school credit to be awarded to students enrolled in a middle grades course if the course content and requirements are equivalent to a course offered in the high school.

003.05C As required in 92 NAC 18, school systems accept the academic credit earned at Interim Program Schools and issue diplomas to students transferring from Interim Program Schools who have met the requirements for graduation from their own accredited high school.  ...004.04C Local Options for Providing High School Courses.

004.04C1 High schools may meet the instructional unit requirements of Section 004.04B through integrated courses, as defined in Section 002.11, if the school has on file locally a description of the curriculum or course including a list of the goals, an explanation of the subjects included, and the rationale for allocating instructional units to appropriate subject fields in Section 004.04B.

004.04C2 High schools may count instructional units for two courses in a subject field taught in the same classroom at the same time if the courses are primarily individualized wherein all students do independent projects or practice. (Examples: Spanish 3 and 4, Accounting 1 and 2, Art 1 and 2)

004.04C3 Schools may use performance based curriculum or courses as an option in place of any subjects in Section 004.04B if they have a written description of the curricula or course which includes the goals, representative instructional experiences, expected student performance for accomplishment of the goals, and the rationale for allocating instructional units for the course. The written description is approved by the local board of education and is on file in the school. Performance based curriculum provides learning opportunities for students equivalent to or greater than those through the course(s) under Section 004.04B, but may take less than the time required in Section 002.12 for determining instructional units.

004.04C4 Instructional units may be counted each year for two courses taught in alternating years not to exceed one course in each of four subject fields, as listed in Section 004.04B, provided schedules verifying alternating courses are kept on file in the school system. As an example, a high school that alternates a course that generates 10 instructional units in World Language II in the current year, with a course that generated 10 instructional units in World Language I the previous year, may count 20 instructional units each year. A school board of a school district shall not establish an alternating biennial secondary course offering in any subject area for which the State Board of Education has adopted content standards pursuant to section 79-704(2) and 79-760.01 R.R.S..

See: http://www.education.ne.gov/Legal/webrulespdf/RULE10_PLEDGE_2012.pdf

p.4, 15

State law--not the IDEA--dictates the substantive standards for graduation. 92 NAC Rule 10-003.05 provides graduation requirements for each NE high school from grades nine through twelve. Additionally, Neb. Rev. Stat. §79-729 states that the graduation requirements prescribed in the statute do not apply to high school students whose individualized education plans prescribe a different course of instruction. Therefore, the IEP Team is responsible for determining the student’s course of instruction; considering the district’s graduation requirements and the student’s progress on meeting annual goals.

See: http://www.education.ne.gov/sped/bobbing/Graduation%20Considerations.pdf  p.1

And

Consider graduation requirements and IEP annual goals: Neither Rule 51 nor IDEA includes a requirement that an IEP contain specifically identified graduation criteria or a graduation plan; however, it is recognized that many districts document the graduation requirements in the student’s IEP. Deciding to document discussions about the student’s graduation plans either in the IEP or in IEP meeting notes may assist the IEP Team with documenting meaningful opportunities the parent was offered during the development, review, or revision of their child's IEP. State law--not the IDEA--dictates the substantive standards for graduation. 92 NAC Rule 10-003.05 provides graduation requirements for each NE high school from grades nine through twelve. Additionally, Neb. Rev. Stat. §79-729 states that the graduation requirements prescribed in the statute do not apply to high school students whose individualized education plans prescribe a different course of instruction. Therefore, the IEP Team is responsible for determining the student’s course of instruction; considering the district’s graduation requirements and the student’s progress on meeting annual goals.

See: http://www.education.ne.gov/sped/bobbing/Graduation%20Considerations.pdf p.1

Nevada “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Requires 22.5 credits.

American Government (1)

American History (1)

Arts & Humanities (1)

Computers* (.5)

English Language Arts (4)

Health (.5)

Mathematics (3)

Physical Education (2)

Science (2)

*can be taken in 7th or 8th grade GPA need to check with local districts  AND  The remaining credits needed for graduation are elective and therefore not identified per content area.

2. As per NRS 389.018, 9th grade students, beginning in the 2007-2008 school year and each class thereafter, must enroll in the following:

a. Four credits of English

b. Four credits of mathematics, including Algebra I and Geometry or equivalent integrated courses

c. Three credits of science, including two laboratory classes

d. Three credits of social studies, including American Government, American History, and World History or Geography

Each district in Nevada has the option of adding to the credit requirements (see the district link options below in Appendix A for specific district credit requirements).

See: http://www.doe.nv.gov/NDE_Offices/APAC/Resources/Nevada_State_Requirements_for_Graduation/

 

Course Credit

1. Can a school district refuse to give any credit at all for participation in special education classes?

2. What criteria do school districts use to determine what kind of credit will be given for students with disabilities participating in general or special education classes?

3. Can the criteria vary from school to school? Even if the criteria are established at the school district level, can the application of criteria vary from school to school?

State regulations define "unit of credit" as "an amount of credit which is awarded to a pupil for his successful completion of a course containing at least 120 hours of instruction or the equivalent." (NAC 389.040). Neither IDEA nor Section 504 specifically addresses the issues of grades or credits; therefore, standards for determining successful completion (i.e., "grading") and awarding credit for coursework are established at the local school district level, within the framework of individualized, nondiscriminatory decision-making. In order to avoid acting in a discriminatory manner, school districts must be able to articulate the educational rationale and criteria used for awarding credit, and criteria must be applied consistently from school to school. Classes may be taken for no credit as part of a student's individualized educational program (IEP), and may be graded based upon criteria outlined in the particular student's IEP. (Letter to 3 Runkel, 25 IDELR 387). A class may be taken for no credit as part of a student's IEP (e.g., a course where students who are not disabled also do not receive credit).

In the design of courses for students with disabilities, attention should be given to aligning content to the general curriculum so that general education credit will be awarded whenever appropriate to reflect students' accomplishments. The IDEA regulations focus on access to general curriculum for students with disabilities in several key areas. For example, IEPs must include measurable annual goals that meet "the child's needs that result from the child's disability to enable the child to be involved in and progress in the general curriculum." (34 CFR 300.347(a)(2)). Further, IEPs must describe the special education, related services, and supplementary aids and services for the student "to be involved and progress in the general curriculum" (34 CFR 300.347(a)(3)).

Generally, different grading systems for students with disabilities who participate in the general curriculum are only permitted if the student's IEP committee adopts a different scheme in response to the student's individual needs. OCR offered the following analysis in a 1991 investigation concerning the coding of grades to indicate situations where coursework was modified in conjunction with a special education program for students with disabilities: The district has the authority to establish course and grade requirements, and the district [in question] has developed grading standards for handicapped students, who are enrolled in regular classes, that must be met in order for the student to receive a regular grade versus a grade coded as special education. Evidence shows that the grading standards are not discriminatory against LD students because they are provided notice of the course/grade requirements and have the option of earning a regular grade, if desired. Furthermore, when needed, LD students enrolled in regular courses are provided course modifications, to the maximum extent possible to meet their individual needs, in order to provide them the opportunity to earn regular grades." (Metropolitan (TN) Pub. Sch. Dist. 18 IDELR 971)

In a 1995 investigation regarding a school district that had adopted a system for assigning lower or different grade weights to special education courses, OCR analyzed several factors related to the district's system (North East (TX) Independent School District, 24 IDELR 298):

• whether a student's placement in "special," "basic," "regular," or "honors" classes was individually determined through an IEP process

• whether the district could articulate a legitimate educational reason for not awarding academic credit for the "basic" and "special education" classes equivalent to the academic credit given for "regular" classes in the same subject matter

• whether there were significant differences in methods of instruction and quantity of material between the classes

• whether all students with disabilities were placed in "basic" and "special education" classes, or whether some students with disabilities were placed in "regular" or "honors" classes.

See: http://www.doe.nv.gov/NDE_Offices/Special_Education/Programs/Special_Education/Resources/Additional_Resources/
Coursework,_Credits,_Promotions,_and_Graduation_Ceremonies_for_Students_with_Disabilities/

p.2-3

New Hampshire “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

There shall be a minimum of 20 credits for a regular high school diploma, unless the local school board has set a requirement of more than 20 credits for a regular high school diploma, in which case the local credit requirement shall apply. …

Required Graduation Competencies by Content Areas Credit(s)

Arts education ½ credit,

Information and communications technologies ½ credit,

English 4 credits,

Mathematics that encompasses algebra, mathematical modeling, statistics and probability, complex applications of measurement, applied geometry, graphical presentation and interpretation, statistics and data analysis 3 credits,

Physical sciences 1 credit,

Biological sciences 1 credit,

US and NH history 1 credit,

US and NH government/civics ½ credit,

Economics, including personal finance ½ credit

World history, global studies, or geography ½ credit,

Health education ½ credit,

Physical education 1 credit,

Open electives 6 credits,

Totals 20 credits

·    The rigor and number of graduation competencies shall align with the equivalent of the credits as outlined in Table 306-3.

·    In addition to the graduation competencies aligned with credits as outlined in Table 306-3, students shall also demonstrate achievement of additional competencies through the equivalent of 6 elective courses, career and technical education courses, or extended learning opportunities of their choosing. These additional competencies required for graduation should align with student interests and should prepare the student for successful transitions into careers and college.

·    The local school board shall adopt a policy relative to counting achievement and demonstration of graduation competencies from course work earned in one content area toward meeting any graduation competencies in another content area.

·    The local school board of each high school shall award a regular high school diploma to those students who achieve and demonstrate all graduation competencies as encompassed in at least 20 credits.

·    The local school board shall require that a high school have in place competency assessments for all courses offered through the high school.

·    The local school board of each high school shall award a regular high school diploma to all students, with and without disabilities, who have achieved and demonstrated their local high school’s required graduation competencies.  (ad) A local school board shall adopt policies pertaining to early graduation for individual students. Such policies shall require parental involvement for students under the age of 18. Consistent with local policy, the high school principal shall approve such requests if he/she determines that all state and local graduation requirements will be met and that early graduation is related to the career or educational plans of the student making the request. Upon demonstration of all graduation competencies, awarding of appropriate credits, and approval by the high school principal, the student shall be awarded a high school diploma.

o The principal shall evaluate the transcripts of students who transfer into a secondary school from another educational program, or state, to determine previous educational experiences toward meeting graduation competencies.

o Upon receipt of a written request from the local school board, the commissioner of education shall waive a particular graduation requirement and shall permit the local board to award a high school diploma to a student if the commissioner determines that:(1) Such action is in the best interests of the student; and

·    At least one of the following circumstances exists:

o The student has a debilitating illness which limits school attendance;

o The student has a physical disability which precludes participation in physical education;

o The student moved into a New Hampshire school district from out of state during grade 12 and was not able to schedule a particular graduation requirement; or

·    d. Another condition exists beyond the control of the student similar to the conditions described in a., b., or c.

See: http://www.education.nh.gov/legislation/documents/ed3062014-min-stands.pdf

p.33-37

Parents of students attending private high schools in New Hampshire should be aware that private/nonpublic high schools are not required to meet the same graduation requirements as the public schools. Table 306-2 in the New Hampshire Code of Administrative Rules Part Ed 306, Minimum Standards for Public School Approval, lists the subjects and 20 credits required for public high school graduation. Local school boards have authority to establish additional requirements, to determine the placement of incoming transfer students, and to accept for credit, or decline to accept, work completed at schools previously attended by the transferring student. The Commissioner of Education may waive a particular graduation requirement as described in Ed 306.27(u) upon receipt of a written request from the local school board. Parents may appeal a decision of a local school board to the State Board of Education after exhausting appeal procedures at the local level.

See: http://www.education.nh.gov/program/school_approval/approval_faq.htm#instruction

In each high school, the minimum yearly course load for a student shall be the equivalent of 4 credits, except that this requirement may be modified for: (1) Students with an individualized education program (IEP) has been developed in accordance with Ed 1109; (2) Students for whom early graduation has been approved as provided in (t) below; or (3) Those individuals in special or unusual circumstances as provided by local school board policy.

See: http://www.education.nh.gov/legislation/documents/ed3062014-min-stands.pdf, p.36

 

New Jersey “Close To”: District Defines Alternative Coursework

Language Arts Literacy -- 20 credits aligned to grade 9 to 12 standards

Math -- 15 credits including algebra I content (effective with the 2008-2009 9th grade class), geometry content (effective with the 2010-2011 9th grade class), and a third year of math that builds upon algebra I and geometry and prepares students for college and 21st century careers (effective with the 2012-2013 9th grade class)

Science -- 15 credits including laboratory biology (effective with the 2008-2009 9th grade class); chemistry, environmental science or

physics (effective with the 2010-2011 9th grade class); and an additional lab/inquiry-based science (effective with the 2012-2013 9th grade class)

Social Studies -- 15 credits including histories and integrated civics, economics, geography, and global content

Economics -- 2.5 credits in financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy (effective with the 2010-2011 9th grade class)

The updated graduation requirements also include the introduction of the Alternative High School Assessment to replace the Special Review Assessment (SRA), which currently is administered to students who cannot demonstrate proficiency of current curriculum standards via the 11th grade statewide assessment. The proposal also includes a phase-in of personalized student learning plans to follow students from middle school through high school graduation. The personalized plans would set learning goals for students based on their personal, academic and career interests, and would include the involvement of teachers, counselors and parents.

“Personalized learning plans will be instrumental in discovering how each child learns best and in what subjects and careers he or she holds an interest,” said Commissioner Davy. “These plans will expose a student to new opportunities and actively engage parents, teachers and counselors in education decision making.” The graduation requirements are based on recommendations from the New Jersey High School Redesign Steering Committee and the department’s Secondary Transformation Committee.

See: http://www.state.nj.us/education/news/2009/0220req.htm, pp.1-2

Through the IEP process and pursuant to N.J.A.C. 6A:14-4.11, district boards of education may specify alternate requirements for a State-endorsed diploma for individual students with disabilities as defined in N.J.A.C. 6A:14-1.3.

1. District boards of education shall specifically address any alternate requirements for graduation in a student’s IEP, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 6A:14-4.11.

2. District boards of education shall develop and implement procedures for assessing whether a student has met the specified alternate requirements for graduation individually determined in an IEP.

See: http://www.nj.gov/education/code/current/title6a/chap8.pdf, p.34

New Mexico “Far From”: Approval Must Be Obtained for Alternative Coursework Has Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

F-2011–2012 & 2012–2013 G-Classes of 2015 & 2016: 

24 units to include:

• 4 units English

• 4 units math (one unit = or > than algebra 2)

• 3 units science (2 w/lab)

• 3.5 units social science, including United States history and geography, world history and geography and government and economics, and .5 unit New Mexico history

• 1 unit physical education

• 1 unit career cluster, workplace readiness or language other than English

• 7.5 units electives

One of the above units must be honors, Advanced Placement, dual credit, or distance learning.

See: http://ped.state.nm.us/ped/GradDocs/guidance/Graduation%20Course%20
Requirements%2020012%20-%202017.pdf

The IEP team must consider the program of study in the order of the options listed in the rule. If the IEP team chooses a graduation option other than the standard, the team must justify and document the reasons for doing so. Any modified program of study can depart from the standard program only as far as necessary to meet the individual student’s needs. Graduation plans must be a part of all IEPs beginning with the 8th grade IEP and at all points thereafter. The IEP team will also determine whether additional evaluations, reports, or documents are necessary to support a smooth and effective transition to post-secondary

See: http://swmcdn.com/site_0450/NEREC_PathwaystoDiploma_050813.pdf

p.21

Departures from the standard program of study for students receiving special education services and supports shall be considered in the order of the options listed in Subparagraph (b) of Paragraph (13) of Subsection J of 6.29.1.9 NMAC. [These options, which must be submitted in a prior written notice of proposed action, include: standard program of study; and a career readiness alternative program of study; plus an option for student in the AA-AAS.] Any modified program of study may depart from a standard program of study only so far as is necessary to meet an individual student's educational needs as determined by the IEP Team. Districts and charter schools are obligated to meet the requirements IDEA to provide students with IEPs on any one of the three programs of study, and access to the general curriculum in the least restrictive environment. When an alternative program of study is developed, a building administrator or designee who has knowledge about the student shall be a member of the IEP team. (New Mexico Public Education Department, 2014, p. 22).

See: http://www.sfps.info/documentcenter/view/11182

New York “Close To”: State Defines Alternative Coursework

Regents diploma/Local diploma

English language arts: 4 cr,

Social Studies 4(a) cr,

Mathematics 3(b) cr,

Science 3(b) cr,

Health .5 cr,

The Arts 1 cr,

Languages Other Than English 1(d) cr,

Physical Education 2 cr,

Electives 3.5 cr.

Total Credits Required 22.(a)

Four credits required, including 1 unit in American History and 1/2 unit each in Participation in Government and Economics.

(b) Students may meet the learning standards in technology either in a course in technology education or through an integrated course combining technology with mathematics and/or science. …A commencement-level course in technology education may be used as the third unit of credit in science or mathematics, but not both.(d) Students with a disability may be excused from the requirement for one unit of credit in LOTE if so indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP). Students must receive LOTE instruction no later than the beginning of Grade 8 and complete 2 units of study by the end of grade 9.

See: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/gradreq/2009GradReqDetails.html

(d) Students with a disability may be excused from the requirement for one unit of credit in LOTE [langauges other than English] if so indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP). Students must receive LOTE instruction no later than the beginning of Grade 8 and complete 2 units of study by the end of grade 9.

See: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/ciai/gradreq/GradReq3columnStyle7_1.pdf

p.2

North Carolina Same as for All Students

Has two courses of study leading to one diploma.

Content Area

Future-Ready Core

Future-Ready Occupational

English

4

English – 4

Math

4

Math – 3

Science

3

Science – 2

Social Studies

3

Social Studies – 2

World Languages

Not required but 2 minimum for admission to UNC system

Not required

Health and Physical Education

1

1

Electives or other requirements

6 total

2 electives from CTE, Arts, World languages

4 electives from one of CTE, JROTC, Arts, Any other subject

6 total

Occupational Prep:

OCS Prep

Elective credits/completion of IEP objectives/Career Portfolio required

Career/Technical

 

4

Arts Education

 

Recommended: at least 1 in an arts discipline and/or requirement by local decision

 

 

21 credits

22 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/docs/curriculum/home/graduationrequirements.pdf

[Same]

North Dakota “Far From”: Allowance for Exemption from Coursework Requirements

English Language Arts – 4

Math – 3

Science – 3

Social Studies – 3

Physical Education – 1  or ½ phy ed and ½ health

Foreign Language, Native American Languages, Fine Arts, or Career and Technical Education – 3

Electives - 5

See: http://www.nd.gov/docr/juvenile/Education/Student%20Services/School%20Programs/
2010-11%20School%20Catalog.pdf
, p. 7

3. Can coursework requirements for granting a diploma be waived for students with disabilities?

Yes. Although there are no restrictions in either IDEA 2004, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the American with Disabilities Act that would prohibit a district from waiving or modifying coursework requirements for identified students, the choice for districts is an option, not a mandate or a requirement. Learner requirements that are waived must be identified on the student’s IEP. If modifications are allowed, policies should be applied consistently to all eligible students.

See: http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/speced1/laws/policy/1005paper.pdf, p. 6

 

Ohio “Far From”: Allowance for Exemption from Coursework Requirements

State Minimum:
English Language Arts – 4 units
Health - .5 unit
Mathematics – 4 units
Physical education - .5 unit
Science – 3 units
Social students – 3 units
Electives -  5 units
Economics and financial literacy
Fine Arts

See: http://education.ohio.gov/getattachment/Topics/What-s-Happening-with-Ohio-s-Graduation
-Requiremen/Graduation-Requirements-2014-2017/Graduation-Checklist-2014.pdf.aspx
, p. 1

·   As a part of the transition planning process an IEP team for a student with a disability who enters the ninth grade on or after July 1, 2010 may decide that based on the student’s post-secondary goals he or she will complete the required Ohio Core coursework. If accommodations are needed in these courses, they should be indicated on the student’s IEP. The IEP team also may consider using education options described in the information about the Core coursework to assist the student in meeting the course requirements. Core coursework should be noted in the postsecondary transition planning section under “Course of Study” on the student’s IEP.

·   An IEP team for a student with a disability who enters the ninth grade prior to July 1, 2010 may decide that based on the student’s post-secondary goals he or she will complete the high school curriculum of 20 units that was in place prior to the Ohio Core Curriculum as outlined in ORC 3313.603 (B). This should be noted in the postsecondary transition planning section under “Course of Study” on the student’s IEP.

·   Based on the student’s goals identified in his or her postsecondary transition plan, the IEP team may decide to use the opt-out provision for the required Core coursework for a student with a disability who enters ninth grade on or after July 1, 2010, and before July 1, 2014. The student would complete courses needed to meet the goals for employment or post-secondary education indicated on his or her transition plan on the IEP. This should be noted in the postsecondary transition planning section under “Course of Study” on the student’s IEP.

The IEP team may decide that a student with a disability will meet graduation requirements by successfully meeting the goals on the student’s standards-based IEP, as permitted by section ORC §3313.61(A)(1). This option is intended only for students with significant cognitive disabilities. This should be noted in the postsecondary transition planning section of the student’s IEP.

See: http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Special-Education/Ohio-Core-and-Students-with-Disabilities, p. 1

And

The consent should also acknowledge that 1) one consequence of not completing the Ohio core curriculum is ineligibility to enroll in most state universities without further coursework and 2) the student must complete the alternative curriculum established by the school that includes at a minimum the curriculum required in ORC §3313.603(B). …Students who earn a high school diploma under the Opt-Out provision will be prohibited from attending most state universities in Ohio without further coursework. The Opt-Out was designed to be temporary and yet provide some students with a period of transition to the more rigorous curriculum requirements of the Ohio core. Some students may not feel adequately prepared for the more rigorous requirements; specifically four units of mathematics that must include Algebra II or its equivalent and a unit of advanced science in addition to a unit of physical science and a unit of life science. Other students may feel that their career or college goals might not require the more rigorous curriculum of the Ohio core. …Four cohorts of entering ninth graders will be eligible to pursue the Opt-Out provision. Unless the provision is extended by legislative action, it will end with students who enter ninth grade for the first time on or after July 1, 2014. (Ohio Department of Education, 2012, p.1-2) See: http://education.ohio.gov/getattachment/Topics/Academic-Content-Standards/New-Learning-Standards/The-Ohio-Core-Opt-Out/Core-Opt-Out-FAQs.pdf.aspx

Oklahoma Same as for All Students

College preparatory/work ready curriculum for high school graduation
English – 4 units
Mathematics – 3 Units

Laboratory Science – 3 units

History and Citizenship Skills – 3 units

Foreign or Non-English Language or Computer Technology – 2 Units

Fine Arts or Speech – 1 Unit

Elective – 6 Units

1 additional unit or set of competencies selected from any courses listed previously

Personal Financial Literacy
Testing Requirements (Unclear if this is needed for Core Curriculum)

Core curriculum (opt-out option from College prep)
Language Arts – 4 units

Mathematics – 3 units

Science – 3 units

Social Studies – 3 units

The Arts – 2 units

Electives – 2 units

See: http://www.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/documents/files/SUCCESS_HS_GRAD
_Parent%20Checklist%202014-15.pdf
, p. 1

[Same]

Oregon Same as for All Students

English Language Arts – 4 units

Mathematics – 3 units

Science – 3 units

Social Sciences – 3 units

Physical Education – 1 unit

Health – 1 unit

Second Language, The Arts, Career & Technical Education – 3 units

Electives – 6 units
Credit for Proficiency – students have the option to earn credit based on demonstrated proficiency.

Essential Skills Testing
Personalized Learning Requirements
Modified Diploma available

See: http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?id=1681

And

http://www.ode.state.or.us/gradelevel/hs/transition/moddipfaq-final.pdf

Districts may award credit for proficiency as an option described by the OAR below, adopted by the State Board of Education January 23, 2003. Credit Options (581-022-1131)

(1) A school district shall grant credit for work satisfactorily completed in any district school, including an alternative education program as defined in ORS 336.615 and ORS 336.625, provided the method for accruing credit is described in the student’s personal education plan and the student either:

(a) Successfully completes classroom or equivalent work (e.g., required and elective courses, supervised independent study, career-related learning experiences, project based learning) in a course of at least 130 clock hours in accordance with OAR 581-022-0102;

(b) Successfully completes a unit of credit where performance-based criteria acceptable to the school district are identified; or

(c) Demonstrates competency or mastery of subject as defined by the school district by any one or more of the following as approved by the district:

(A) Successfully passes an appropriate exam;

(B) Provides sample of work or other evidence which demonstrates equivalent knowledge or skill; and

(C) Provides documentation of prior learning activities or experiences (e.g., certification of training, letters, diplomas, awards, etc.) or;

(d) Successfully completes a combination of the requirements set out in subsections (1) (a-c) of this section.” (Oregon State Board of Education, 2012, p.1) See: http://www.ode.state.or.us/gradelevel/hs/transition/moddipoar012012.doc

[Same]

 

Pennsylvania “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

To earn a high school diploma in Pennsylvania, students must complete 120 credits in specific subjects, as well as undertake a final project and pass keystone exams. Detailed requirements as set by the Pennsylvania Department of Education are outlined below.

Credit Hours

Students in Pennsylvania must accumulate at least 120 credit hours in the following subjects to earn a high school diploma:

·      English

·      Science

·      Social studies

·      Mathematics

·      Health and physical education

·      Arts and humanities

Individuals also must choose at least five approved courses in subjects like music, art, business education, computer science, home economics, consumer education, industrial arts, foreign language or vocational education.

Culminating Project

Pennsylvania secondary students must complete a state-required culminating or senior project by the end of their final year. Students can usually begin working on the project in their sophomore year and typically collaborate with a mentor from the project's initial development to its completion.

Before work on the project can begin, students must submit a written proposal to their faculty mentor, who must approve the project before the student can move on. The project serves as an opportunity for students to showcase their talents and interests. It also tests their abilities to go beyond what is taught in a conventional high school curriculum

See: http://education-portal.com/pennsylvania_high_school_diploma.html

ARE CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES ENTITLED TO GRADUATE

WITH A REGULAR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA?

Yes. A child with a disability in Pennsylvania who is receiving special

education services is entitled to graduate with a regular high school diploma if (1) she completes the same graduation requirements as a regular education child or (2) the child’s IEP Team determines that the child has satisfied the IEP goals to the extent necessary for graduation. Pennsylvania does not award children with disabilities “certificates of attendance” as is done in some other states.

See: https://www.drnpa.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/graduation-requirements-for-children-with-disabilities.pdf

 

Rhode Island Same as for All Students

·   Demonstrated proficiency in 6 core areas (English Language Arts, math, science, social studies, the Arts and technology)

·   Successful completion of 20 courses (at a minimum)

·   Completion of 2 performance assessments (exhibitions, portfolios and/or comprehensive course assessments)

·   Senior Project, Exhibition or Portfolio

Districts may include additional expectations or requirements such as additional coursework requirements, a level of proficiency on the state assessments or community service learning.

See: http://www.ride.ri.gov/StudentsFamilies/RIPublicSchools/DiplomaSystem.aspx

[Same]

South Carolina Same as for All Students

English Language Arts – 4 units

Mathematics – 4 units

Science – 3 units

US History and Constitution – 1 unit

Economics - .5 unit

US Government - .5 unit

Other social studies course(s) – 1 unit

Physical Education or Junior ROTC 0 – 1 unit

Computer science (including keyboarding) – 1 unit

Foreign language or career and technology education – 1 unit

Electives – 7 units

See: http://ed.sc.gov/agency/programs-services/124/

[Same]

South Dakota “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

English Language Arts – 4 units

Mathematics – 3 units

Lab Science – 3 units

Social Studies – 3 units

Approved Career & Technical Education, Capstone Experience or Service Learning, or World Language - ~1 unit

Fine Arts – 1 units

Personal Finance or Economics - .5 unit

Physical Education - .5 unit

Health or Health Integration - 1 unit

See: http://doe.sd.gov/octe/documents/GradRequirements.pdf  p.3

Amending Graduation Requirements: South Dakota State Special Education Rules ARSD 24:05:27:12, allows the IEP team to modify specific units of credits toward the graduation requirements. Amendments may include modifications and/or substitutions made to

accommodate the needs of the individual student; the nature and extent of

any amendments must be documented in the IEP.

See: https://doe.sd.gov/oess/documents/sped_transition_GraduationQA.pdf

p.2

Tennessee “Close To”: State Defines Alternative Coursework

Math – 4 credits

English -4 credits

Science -3 credits

Social Studies – 3 credits

Physical Education and Wellness – 1.5 credits

Personal Finance - .5 credit

Foreign Language – 2 credits

Fine Arts – 1 credit

Elective Focus – 3 credits

See: http://www.tn.gov/education/instruction/graduation.shtml

Students with qualifying disabilities as documented in the IEP shall be required to achieve at least Algebra I and Geometry (or equivalent), Biology I and two other lab science credits.

- The required number of credits in math and science will be achieved through strategies such as, but not limited to, increased time, appropriate methodologies, and accommodations as determined by the IEP team.

See: http://www.tn.gov/sbe/2008Januarypdfs/IV%20N%20High%20School%20Transition%20Policy%20&%20Rule.pdf   p.2, items e and g.

Texas “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

Minimum High School Program (22 credits):

English language arts – 4 credits

Mathematics – 3 credits

Science – 2 credits

Social studies – 2.5 credits

Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits - .5 credit

Academic elective – 1 credit

Physical education – 1 credit

Speech - .5 credit

Fine Arts – 1 credit

Elective – 6.5 credits

Recommended High School Program (26 credits):

ELA – 4 credits

Math – 4 credits

Science – 4 credits

Social studies – 3.5 credits

Economics - .5 credit

Languages other than English – 2 credits

Physical Education – 1 credit

Speech - .5 credit

Fine Arts – 1 credit

Elective – 5.5 credits

See: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=25769809836&libID=25769809849

A student can also graduate and receive a regular high school diploma under the minimum high school program outlined in TAC Chapter 74, upon completing the minimum curriculum and credit requirements for students in general education and participating in required assessments. For these students the ARD committee must determine whether passing the assessment is a requirement for graduation.

Additionally, a student can graduate by completing the minimum credit requirements for students in general education, completing the minimum curriculum requirements to the extent possible as determined by the ARD committee, and completing the requirements of the IEP, including one of the following conditions outlined in the IEP: (a) full-time employment and sufficient self-help skills to maintain employment without direct support from the school district, (b) demonstration of full-time employability skills, including skills related to obtaining or retaining employment, or (c) access to employment or educational options not within the legal responsibility of public education for which the student has been prepared as part of the IEP.

Finally, a student receiving special education services may also graduate and receive a regular high school diploma upon the ARD committee determining that the student no longer meets age eligibility requirements and has completed the requirements specified in the IEP.

See: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=2147497565   p.1

Utah “Far From”: Allowance for Exemption from Coursework Requirements

ELA – 4 credits

Math – 3 credits

Science – 3 credits

Social Studies – 3 credits

Directed coursework – 3 credits

Physical Education – 2 credits

Electives – 6 credits

Applied, advanced and supplemental courses may be added to the appropriate list using the following procedure and criteria.

Language Arts, Mathematics, Science

Determined by the local school board and approved by USOE, using the following criteria.

(i) courses are within the field/discipline of language arts with a significant portion of instruction aligned to language arts content, principles, knowledge, and skills; and

(ii) courses provide instruction that leads to student understanding of the nature and disposition of language arts; and

(iii) courses apply the fundamental concepts and skills of language arts; and

(iv) courses provide developmentally appropriate content; and

(v) courses develop skills in reading, writing, listening, speaking, and presentation.

See: http://www.schools.utah.gov/CURR/gradinfo/Home/High-School-Requirements-by-Year.aspx [As of October 4, 2014. Updated version at same web address shows slightly different information (e.g., 3.5 credits for Directed coursework)]

G. Students with disabilities served by special education programs may have changes made to graduation requirements through individual IEPs to meet unique educational needs. A student's IEP shall document the nature and extent of modifications and substitutions or exemptions made to accommodate a student with disabilities.

H. The Board and USOE may review LEA boards' lists of approved courses for compliance with this rule.

I. Graduation requirements may be modified for individual students to achieve an appropriate route to student success when such modifications:

1.  are consistent with the student's IEP or SEOP or both;

2.  are maintained in the student's file and include the parent's/guardian's signature; and

3.  maintain the integrity and rigor expected for high school graduation, as determined by the Board.

See: http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/code/r277/r277-700.htm

Part G for exemption language.

Vermont “Far From”: Has Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative coursework

Each supervisory union board shall ensure the written and delivered curriculum within their supervisory union is aligned with the standards approved by the State Board of Education. Each school shall enable students to engage annually in rigorous, relevant and comprehensive learning opportunities that allows them to demonstrate proficiency in

a. literacy (including critical thinking, language, reading, speaking and listening, and writing);

b. mathematical content and practices (including numbers, operations, and the concepts of algebra and geometry by the end of grade 10);

c. scientific inquiry and content knowledge (including the concepts of life  sciences, physical sciences, earth and space sciences and engineering design);

d. global citizenship (including the concepts of civics, economics, geography, world language, cultural studies and history);

e. physical education and health education as defined in 16 V.S.A. §131;

f. artistic expression (including visual, media and performing arts); and

g. transferable skills (including communication, collaboration, creativity, innovation, inquiry, problem solving and the use of technology).

…Each school shall provide students in grades 9-12 with one and one-half years of physical education or the equivalent thereof.

See: http://education.vermont.gov/documents/EDU-FinalEQS_AsAdopted.pdf  p.8

Each secondary school board is responsible for setting graduation requirements in accordance with these rules.

See: http://education.vermont.gov/documents/EDU-FinalEQS_AsAdopted.pdf  p.10

Schools must provide students the opportunity to experience learning through flexible and multiple pathways, including but not limited to career and technical education, virtual learning, work-based learning, service learning, dual enrollment and early college. Learning must occur under the supervision of an appropriately licensed educator. Learning expectations must be aligned with state expectations and standards. 

Students must be allowed to demonstrate proficiency by presenting multiple types of evidence, including but not limited to teacher- or student-designed assessments, portfolios, performances, exhibitions and projects.

See: http://education.vermont.gov/documents/EDU-FinalEQS_AsAdopted.pdf  p.7

For students eligible for special education services under IDEA or protected by Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act, the student shall meet the same graduation requirements as non-disabled peers in an accommodated and/or modified manner. These modifications will be documented in each student’s Personalized Learning Plan.

See: http://education.vermont.gov/documents/EDU-FinalEQS_AsAdopted.pdf  p.10

 

Virginia “Close To”: State Defines Alternative Coursework

English – 4

Mathematics – 3

Laboratory Science – 3

History & Social Sciences – 3

Health & Physical Education – 2

Foreign Language, Fine Arts or Career & Technical Education – 2

Economics and Personal Finance – 1

Electives – 4

See: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/graduation/standard.shtml

 

Credit accommodations provide alternatives for students with disabilities in earning the standard and verified credits required to graduate with a Standard Diploma.

Credit accommodations for students with disabilities may include:

•Alternative courses to meet the standard credit requirements

•Modifications to the requirements for locally awarded verified credits

•Additional tests approved by the Board of Education for earning verified credits

•Adjusted cut scores on tests for earning verified credits

•Allowance of work-based learning experiences through career and technical education (CTE) courses

While credit accommodations provide alternate pathways and flexibility, students receiving accommodations must earn the 22 standard credits and six verified credits required to graduate with a Standard Diploma. In contrast, only 20 standard credits and 0 verified credits are required for the Modified Standard Diploma.

See: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/instruction/graduation/credit_accommodations/guidelines_standard_diploma
_credit_accommodations_for_students_with_disabilities_faq.pdf
  p.1

Washington Same as for All Students

English- 3

Math – 3

Science (without lab) – 1

Science (with lab) – 1

Social studies – 2.5

Occupational Education – 1

Health and Fitness – 2

Arts – 1

Electives – 5.5

Culminating Project

See: http://www.k12.wa.us/GraduationRequirements/Requirement-Credits.aspx

[Same]

West Virginia Same as for All Students

Language Arts – 4

Social Studies – 4

Mathematics – 4

Science – 3

Career Concentration – 4

General Core – 3

Electives – 2

See: http://wvde.state.wv.us/riseup/graduationRequirements.php

[Same]

Wisconsin “Far From”: No Language on Rigor for IEP Requirements for Alternative Coursework

English – 4 credits

Social Studies – 3 credits

Mathematics – 3

Science – 3

Physical Education – 1.5

Health Education - .5

Vocational education, foreign languages, fine arts, and other courses – 8.5 credits

See: http://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/statutes/statutes/118/33/1

Statute 118.33 (1)

·   Earned all required credits, or

·   Participated in an alternative education program and demonstrated proficiency equivalent to earning required credits, or

·   Successfully completed the program specified in the

student’s IEP.

See: http://sped.dpi.wi.gov/sped_bul10-08  Part I question 1. What is a regular high school diploma?

Wyoming Same as for All Students

- Four (4) school years of English;
- Three (3) school years of Mathematics;
- Three (3) school years of science;
- Three (3) school years of social studies, including history, American Government and economic systems and institutions;
- Successfully passing an examination on the principles of the constitution of the United States and the state of Wyoming.

Note that local school district has the right to augment these requirements to fit their needs.

See: http://edu.wyoming.gov/in-the-classroom/

Choose What are the graduation requirements for Wyoming to reveal text.

[Same]

 

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