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Get It, Got It, Go!

 

Keep track of the latest news, updates, and resources for IGDIs at Early Learning Labs.

 

 

The Get It, Got It, Go! project developed a website that provided informational materials, assessments, and database-driven systems to help educators, parents, and others for these purposes:

Get It

 

Informational materials and assessment tools (Individual Growth and Development Indicators--IGDIs) for measuring the growth of young children's language and literacy development were available on the website that was created through this project.

Got It

 

Registered users downloaded score recording forms, entered individual child data, and generated graphical reports of children's performance over time.

Go!

 

Users could communicate and collaborate about a child's progress over time and about intervention plans.

 

The Get It, Got It, Go! website has been discontinued. This page contains related information and resources. Current IGDIs information can be found at http://myigdis.com.

What Child Outcomes are Measured by Individual Growth and Development Indicators?

Expressive Communication

The child uses language to convey and comprehend communicative and social intent.

  • Child uses gestures, sounds, words, or sentences (including sign language and augmentative and alternative communication) to convey wants and needs or to express meaning to others.
  • Child responds to others' communication with appropriate gestures, sounds, words, or word combinations (including sign language and augmentative and alternative communication).
  • Child uses gestures, sounds, words, or sentences (including sign language and augmentative and alternative communication) to initiate, respond to, or maintain reciprocal interactions with others.

Adaptive

The child takes responsibility for his/her behavior, health, and well-being, even in the face of challenge or adversity.

  • Child engages in a range of basic self-help skills, including but not limited to skills in dressing, eating, toileting/hygiene and safety/identification.
  • Child meets behavioral expectations (such as following directions, rules, and routines) in home, school, and community settings.
  • Child appropriately varies or continues behavior to achieve desired goals.

Motor

The child negotiates and manipulates the environment.
  • Child moves in a fluent and coordinated manner to play and participate in home, school, and community settings.
  • Child manipulates toys, materials, and objects in a fluent and coordinated manner to play and participate in home, school, and community settings.

Social

The child initiates, responds to, and maintains positive social relationships.

  • Child interacts with peers and adults, maintaining social interactions and participating socially in home, school, and community settings.
  • Child appropriately solves problems in his/her interactions with others.
  • Child shows affect appropriate to the social context.

Cognition

The child uses cognitive skills to explore the environment, reason, and solve problems.

  • Child demonstrates an understanding of age-appropriate information.
  • Child demonstrates recall of verbal and non-verbal events.
  • Child understands and uses concepts related to early literacy skills.
  • Child solves problems that require reasoning about objects, concepts, situations, and people.

Manuscripts

Toward a Technology of Dynamic Indicators of Communicative Expression for Infants and Toddlers

Abstract: Proficiency in expressive communication is an important outcome in early childhood necessary for cognitive and social development. In two studies, this manuscript reports the development of an experimental measure for assessing growth in expressive communication in children birth to three years. The measure was developed using general outcome measurement (GOM) procedures (Deno, 1997; Fuchs & Deno, 1991). GOMs are uniquely appropriate for use in the identification of children having difficulty acquiring a socially valid outcome, like expressive communication, and evaluating the effectiveness of interventions for these children. Results from a sample of 25 infants and toddlers in Study I demonstrated the development and feasibility of these measures. Results from a sample of 50 infants and toddlers repeatedly assessed for nine months in Study II indicated that the measure displayed adequate psychometric properties of reliability and validity and was sensitive to growth over time. Implications for use are discussed.

Best Practices in Assessment of Intervention Results with Infants and Toddlers

Overview: Public policy (PL 99-457, amended by PL 102-119) mandates that preschool aged children with disabilities and their families receive early intervention services, and many states have extended these services to families with infants and toddlers (DEC, 1993). While states vary with regard to the ways in which they identify and serve infants and toddlers with developmental needs, the school psychologist often serves a key role in determining eligibility for services, linking children and families to appropriate interventions, and then determining whether interventions are truly meeting children's and families' needs. This chapter focuses on the role of the school psychologist in carrying out those functions. Specifically, the paper will describe the basic knowledge and skills school psychologists need in addressing the unique challenges in assessing infants and young children. Then the chapter focuses on the emerging area of assessing early intervention results and offers a specific approach for progress monitoring for infants and toddlers being developed by the Early Childhood Research Institute on Measuring Growth and Development (ECRI-MGD).

Best Practices in Measuring Growth and Development of Preschool Children

Overview: This chapter describes Individual Growth and Development Indicators for preschool-aged children. Preschool Individual Growth and Development Indicators (or IGDIs) are quick, efficient, and repeatable measures of correlates or components of developmental performance designed for use with children 30 to 66 months of age. Preschool IGDIs sample child performance in each major developmental domain (i.e., language, social, cognitive, motor, and adaptive), with a special emphasis on assessment related to long-term developmental outcomes that are common across the early childhood years, are functional, and are related to later competence in home, school, and community settings. Preschool IGDIs are one of a growing class of general outcome measures (like curriculum-based measurement) for monitoring child development and achievement and for producing data that support an ongoing and comprehensive decision-making or problem-solving model of assessment and intervention.

Technical Reports

  1. Accountability Systems for Children Between Birth and Age Eight
  2. Selection of General Growth Outcomes for Children Between Birth and Age Eight
  3. National Survey to Validate General Growth Outcomes for Children Between Birth and Age Eight
  4. Research and Development of Individual Growth and Development Indicators for Children Between Birth and Age Eight
  5. Research and Development of Exploring Solutions Assessments for Children Between Birth and Age Eight
  6. Theoretical Foundations of the Early Childhood Research Institute on Measuring Growth and Development: An Early Childhood Problem-Solving Model
  7. Family Outcomes in a Growth and Developmental Model
  8. Psychometric Characteristics of Individual Growth and Development Indicators: Picture Naming, Rhyming, and Alliteration
  9. Monitoring Emergent Literacy Development of Immigrant Preschoolers Who Speak Somali, Spanish, or Hmong

Related Resources

Project Staff

Scott McConnell

Tracy Bradfield

Karen Anderson

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Last modified on February 21, 2013.