Emotional and behavioral disorders teaching licensure and M.Ed. (residency-based)

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Department of Educational Psychology wordmark.

Emotional and behavioral disorders teaching licensure and M.Ed. (residency-based)

Become licensed to teach students with EBD while working as a paraprofessional in an EBD classroom

Candidates will complete a nonconventional residency-based program that will incorporate on-line and traditional classroom instruction with residency-based coaching in classrooms that serve students with severe emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). You will leave the program not only an excellent teacher prepared for a job working with students with severe EBD, but also a leader prepared to implement the most effective evidence-based practices and promote the success of your students.

To apply, you must be employed as a paraprofessional in a level III of IV classroom by one of our partner school districts and include a written recommendation from the district with your application.

EBD students in classroom
E.B.D. alumni, Brittany Beaudette, works with students in an EBD classroom. Read more.

Rated #5 in the nation among special education graduate programs by U.S. News & World Report in 2018

Careers

Graduates of the EBD licensure program:

  • Teach in EBD classrooms
  • Consult with special and general education teachers and evaluation team members
  • Serve students pk-21 with severe emotional behavior disorders from a variety of cultural, linguistic and socio-economic background

Coursework

The non-conventional emotional & behavioral disorders licensure and special education M.Ed. program require the completion of 36 credits. Your total number of required credits may vary based on previous educational experience or licensures.

Download a sample plan of an EBD course schedule.

Alumni profile

"This program is what the education field needs to continue to open doors for educators that know and understand the job. Our program is putting teachers into the community that have a love, desire, and passion to be advocates for our sometimes marginalized students."

GinaMarie Theesfeld headshot.

GinaMarie Theesfeld, M.Ed. '16 Special education teacher, Minneapolis Public Schools

Read more about GinaMarie's experience.

Faculty

Jennifer McComas headshot

Jennifer McComasAssociate department chair, special education program coordinator, head emotional behavioral disorders licensure and M.Ed. and special education M.A. with emphasis in A.B.A. and programs
jmccomas@umn.edu

  • Functional analysis of problem behavior in educational and residential settings
  • Basic behavioral processes maintaining desirable and undesirable behavior, such as schedules of reinforcement, stimulus control, and establishing operations
  • Behavioral treatment of problem behavior based on concurrent schedules of reinforcement as well as antecedent stimuli
  • Analysis of academic performance of students with behavior problems