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ULA Workshop: Race, Immigration, and Being Known in School: Teaching to Engage Identities Wednesday, December 6, 2017 | 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

TIES Event Center

This presentation and workshop emphasizes schools as important sites for supporting the social and academic identities of adolescent youth. The session will examine the significance of being known, particularly for youth of color and immigrant students, and what it means for teaching and learning in classrooms. As well, participants will engage in discussions and projects that consider the ways in which teaching is inherently a relational and political activity, with implications for teacher-student relationships and identity-affirming pedagogy.

Speakers:

Dr. Vichet Chhuon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Interim Chair in the Department of Chicano and Latino Studies, and Faculty in the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Minnesota. His scholarship is focused on critical issues in education including the schooling of immigrant youth and students of color and his work has appeared in leading publications including American Educational Research Journal, The Urban Review, and Journal of College Student Development. Dr. Chhuon has received Early Career Awards from the American Educational Research Association and the Association of Asian American Studies, and the Presidential Research Award from the National Association for Multicultural Education. He is currently involved in immigration justice work and efforts to increase the racial diversity in Minnesota.

Dr. Nimo Abdi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Minnesota. Her research and teaching engages the intersections of race, class, gender and religion, to understand Somali youth’s experiences in schools.

Ezekiel Joubert III is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Culture and Teaching Program at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on how Black rural youth make sense of schooling and opportunity.

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For the past 22 years, the Urban Leadership Academy has provided programming and sustained dialogue focused on the continuous professional development of school leaders. Each workshop provides educational leaders the opportunity to explore the complexity of leading learning organizations in order to better serve students.