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Roisman

Glenn I Roisman

Professor
Ph.D., 2002, University of Minnesota

Institute of Child Development
Room 104A
51 E River Rd

Tel:612-624-7958
roism001@umn.edu

Early experience, social development, close relationships, biologically informed studies of development.

Relationships Research Lab

Professor Roisman’s scholarly interests concern the legacy of early relationship experiences as a foundation for social, cognitive, and biological development across the lifespan. As such, his program of research focuses on the childhood antecedents of adaptation within the developmentally salient contexts of adolescence and adulthood. This work is multi-informant and multi-method, employing self-report, observational, psychophysiological, and interview-based methods with individuals and couples. In spanning multiple levels of a developmental analysis of individual and dyadic trajectories, his laboratory's goal is to provide insight into the childhood experiences and resources that scaffold healthy adjustment in the years of maturity, with a particular focus on prospective assessment of individuals’ experiences within the normative range (e.g., direct observations of parental sensitive-responsiveness and romantic interactions) as well as atypical early care (e.g., objective reports of abuse and neglect in childhood).

For the last two decades, Professor Roisman has been pursuing this research agenda through: (a) longitudinal investigations of the fate of early experience as a Co-PI on both the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development and the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation, (b) a programmatic set of observational laboratory analogue studies involving administering in-depth Adult Attachment Interviews to college students, stranger dyads, siblings, parents, and romantically involved couples (dating, engaged, married, gay male, and lesbian) about their childhood experiences, (c) experiments designed to better understand the ways in which interpersonal experiences are embodied in fMRI, electrophysiological, and autonomic activation, and (d) secondary analyses of large datasets that provide opportunities to demonstrate the utility of behavior-genetic, taxometric, and meta-analytic approaches for simultaneously resolving questions at the heart of social developmental theory while improving methodology in the study of the legacy of early experience.

In the next several years, Professor Roisman will be studying to what extent, through what mechanisms, and for whom anthropometric indicators and biomarkers of adult physical health have their roots in childhood and adult interpersonal experiences. This program of research will leverage data: (a) to be acquired from the large, normative-risk NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development cohort in their late 20s and early 30s with support from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) (PI: Bleil, R01HL130103; MPIs: Roisman and Bleil, R01HD091132), (b) already collected from the higher-risk Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation through midlife (PI: Simpson, R01AG039453, recently completed with funding from the National Institute on Aging; NIA), and (c) to be collected over the next several years from the large Minnesota Twin Registry sample and their romantic partners in late life with support from the NIA (MPIs: Roisman and Krueger, R01AG053217). Drawing on these landmark longitudinal investigations, Professor Roisman will also continue to pursue with his colleagues the largest and most comprehensive studies ever undertaken on the developmental origins of adult attachment styles and states of mind. Taken together, this work will provide important prospective, longitudinal data from birth to adulthood on social, cognitive, and biological development and, via the Minnesota Twin Registry, significantly improve causal inferences in the study of the developmental foundations of adult physical health and well-being.

In addition, building on his long-standing interests in adolescent development, Professor Roisman has recently begun a collaboration with Professor Suzy Sherf at the Pennsylvania State University to investigate the role of pubertal development and corresponding shifts in social-developmental tasks in the re-organization of the neural networks underlying face processing. This work is sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) (PI: Scherf, R01MH112573).

Professor Roisman is actively recruiting graduate students interested in making contributions to this program of research.

Selected Publications

  1. Books, Monographs, and Special Issues

    Roisman, G.I., & Cicchetti, D. (Eds.) (2017). Attachment in the context of atypical caregiving: Harnessing insights from a developmental psychopathology perspective [Special Issue]. Development and Psychopathology, 29(2), 331-684.

    Booth-LaForce, C., & Roisman, G.I. (Eds). (2014). The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 1-185.

    Cicchetti, D., & Roisman, G.I. (Eds). (2011). The Origins and Organization of Adaptation and Maladaptation: Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology (Vol. 36). New York: Wiley.

    Journal Articles (last 4 years and in press)

    In press

    Martin, J., Raby, K.L., Labella, M.H., & Roisman, G.I. (in press). Childhood abuse and neglect, attachment states of mind, and non-suicidal self-injury. Attachment & Human Development.

    Johnson, W.F., Huelsnitz, C.O., Carlson, E.A., Roisman, G.I., Englund, M.M., Miller, G.E., & Simpson, J.A. (in press). Childhood abuse and neglect and physical health at midlife: Prospective, longitudinal evidence. Development and Psychopathology.

    2017

    Groh, A.M., Narayan, A.J., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Roisman, G.I., Vaughn, B.E., Fearon, R.M.P., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2017). Attachment and temperament in the early life course: A meta-analytic review. Child Development, 88(3), 770-795.

    Roisman, G.I., & Cicchetti, D. (2017). Editorial: Attachment in the context of atypical caregiving. Development and Psychopathology, 29(2), 331-335.

    Roisman, G.I., Rogosch, F.A., Cicchetti, D., Groh, A.M., Haltigan, J.D., Haydon, K.C., Holland, A.S., & Steele, R.D. (2017). Attachment states of mind and inferred childhood experiences in maltreated and comparison adolescents from low income families. Development and Psychopathology, 29(2), 337-345.

    Raby, K.L., Labella, M.H., Martin, J., Carlson, E.A., & Roisman, G.I. (2017). Childhood abuse and neglect and insecure attachment states of mind in adulthood: Prospective, longitudinal evidence from a high-risk sample. Development and Psychopathology, 29(2), 347-363.

    Quevedo, K., Waters, T.E.A., Scott, H., Roisman, G.I., Shaw, D.S., & Forbes, E.E. (2017). Infant attachment history and brain activity in young men during loss and reward processing. Development and Psychopathology, 29(2), 465-476.

    Fearon, R.M.P., & Roisman, G.I. (2017). Attachment theory: Progress and future directions. Current Opinion in Psychology, 15, 131-136.

    Groh, A.M., Fearon, R.P., Van IJzendoorn, M., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M., & Roisman, G.I. (2017). Attachment in the early life course: Meta-analytic evidence for its role in socio-emotional development. Child Development Perspectives, 11(1), 70-76.

    Haltigan, J.D., Roisman, G.I., Cauffman, E., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2017). Correlates of childhood vs. adolescence internalizing symptomatology from infancy to young adulthood. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 46(1), 197-212.

    Waters, T.E.A., Ruiz, S.K., & Roisman, G.I. (2017). Origins of secure base script knowledge and the developmental construction of attachment representations. Child Development, 88(1), 198-209.

    2016

    Roisman, G.I., Fraley, R.C., Haltigan, J.D., Cauffman, E., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2016). Strategic considerations in the search for transactional processes: Methods for detecting and quantifying transactional signals in longitudinal data. Development and Psychopathology, 28(3), 791-800.

    Vaughn, B.E., Waters, T.E.A., Steele, R.D., Roisman, G.I., Bost, K.K., Truitt, W., Waters, H.S., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2016). Multiple domains of parental secure base support during childhood and adolescence contribute to adolescents’ representations of attachment as a secure base script. Attachment & Human Development, 18(4), 317-336.

    Waters, T.E.A., Steele, R.D., Roisman, G.I., Haydon, K.C., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2016). A Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count analysis of the Adult Attachment Interview in two large corpora. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 48(1), 78-88.

    2015

    Cottrell, J.M., Newman, D.A., & Roisman, G.I. (2015). Explaining the Black-White gap in cognitive test scores: Toward a theory of adverse impact. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(6), 1713-1736.

    Groh, A.M., Roisman, G.I., Haydon, K.C., Bost, K., McElwain, N., Garcia, L., & Hester, C. (2015). Mothers’ electrophysiological, subjective, and observed emotional responding to infant crying: The role of secure base script knowledge. Development and Psychopathology, 27(4), 1237-1250.

    Raby, K.L., Roisman, G.I., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2015). Genetic moderation of stability in attachment security from early childhood to age 18 years: A replication study. Developmental Psychology, 51(11), 1645-1649.

    Belsky, J., Newman, D.A., Widaman, K.F., Rodkin, P., Pluess, M., Fraley, R.C., Berry, D., Helm, J.A., & Roisman, G.I. (2015). Differential susceptibility to effects of maternal sensitivity? A study of candidate plasticity genes. Development and Psychopathology, 27(3), 725-746.

    Waters, T.E.A., Fraley, R.C., Groh, A.M., Steele, R.D., Vaughn, B.E., Bost, K.K., Veríssimo, M., Coppola, G., & Roisman, G.I. (2015). The latent structure of secure base script knowledge. Developmental Psychology, 51(6), 823-830.

    Raby, K.L., Roisman, G.I., Fraley, R.C., & Simpson, J.A. (2015). The enduring predictive significance of early sensitivity: Social and academic competence through age 32 years. Child Development, 86(3), 695-708.

    Raby, K.L., Roisman, G.I., Simpson, J.A., Collins, W.A., & Steele, R.D. (2015). Greater maternal insensitivity in childhood predicts greater electrodermal reactivity during conflict discussions with romantic partners in adulthood. Psychological Science, 26(3), 348-353.

    Shlafer, R.J., Raby, K.L., Lawler, J.M., Hesemeyer, P.S., & Roisman, G.I. (2015). Longitudinal associations between adult attachment states of mind and parenting quality. Attachment & Human Development, 17(1), 83-95.

    Fraley, R.C., & Roisman, G.I. (2015). Do early caregiving experiences leave an enduring or transient mark on developmental adaptation? Current Opinion in Psychology, 1, 101-106.

    Haltigan, J.D., & Roisman, G.I. (2015). Infant attachment insecurity and dissociative symptomatology: Findings from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Infant Mental Health Journal, 36(1), 30-41.

  2. 2014

    Steele, R.D., Waters, T.E.A., Bost, K.K., Vaughn, B.E., Truitt, W., Waters, H.S., Booth-LaForce, C., & Roisman, G.I. (2014). Caregiving antecedents of secure base script knowledge: A comparative analysis of young adult attachment representations. Developmental Psychology50(11), 2526-2538.

    Booth-LaForce, C., & Roisman, G.I. (2014). Introduction. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 1-14.

    Haltigan, J.D., Roisman, G.I., & Haydon, K.C. (2014). The latent structure of the Adult Attachment Interview: Exploratory and confirmatory evidence. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 15-35.

    Fraley, R.C., & Roisman, G.I. (2014). Categories or dimensions? A taxometric analysis of the Adult Attachment Interview. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 36-50.

    Groh, A.M., Roisman, G.I., Booth-LaForce, C., Fraley, R.C., Owen, M.T., Cox, M.J., & Burchinal, M.R. (2014). Stability of attachment security from infancy to late adolescence. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 51-66.

    Booth-LaForce, C., Groh, A.M., Burchinal, M.R., Roisman, G.I., Owen, M.T., & Cox, M.J. (2014). Caregiving and contextual sources of continuity and change in attachment security from infancy to late adolescence. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 67-84.

    Roisman, G.I., Haltigan, J.D., Haydon, K.C., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2014). Earned-security in retrospect: Depressive symptoms, family stress, and maternal and paternal sensitivity from early childhood to mid-adolescence. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 85-107.

    Haydon, K.C., Roisman, G.I., Owen, M.T., Booth-LaForce, C., & Cox, M.J. (2014). Shared and distinctive antecedents of Adult Attachment Interview state-of-mind and inferred-experience dimensions. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 108-125.

    Roisman, G.I., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2014). General Discussion. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 126-137.

    Roisman, G.I., Fraley, R.C., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2014). Pulling ourselves up by our bootstraps: A rejoinder to Van IJzendoorn and Bakermans-Kranenburg (2014). In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), 168-173.

    Roisman, G.I., & Booth-LaForce, C. (2014). A candidate gene approach to the study of the origins of Adult Attachment Interview states of mind. In C. Booth-LaForce & G.I. Roisman (Eds)., The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometrics, stability and change from infancy, and developmental origins. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 79(3), Online Supplement S1.

    Emery, H.T., McElwain, N.L., Groh, A.M., Haydon, K.C., & Roisman, G.I. (2014). Maternal dispositional empathy and electrodermal reactivity: Interactive contributions to maternal sensitivity with toddler-aged children. Journal of Family Psychology, 28(4), 505-515.

    Monti, J.D., Pomerantz, E.M., & Roisman, G.I. (2014). Can parents’ involvement in children’s learning offset the effects of early insensitivity on academic adjustment? Journal of Educational Psychology, 106(3), 859-869.

    Haltigan, J.D., Leerkes, E.M., Wong, M.S., Fortuna, K., Roisman, G.I., Supple, A.J., O’Brien, M., Calkins, S.D., & Plamondon, A. (2014). Adult attachment states of mind: Measurement invariance across ethnicity and associations with maternal sensitivity. Child Development, 85(3), 1019-1035.

    Groh, A.M., Fearon, R.P., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Steele, R.D., & Roisman, G.I. (2014). The significance of attachment security for children’s social competence with peers: A meta-analytic study. Attachment & Human Development, 16(2), 103-136.