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Ph.D. in Child Psychology

Welcome!

Our Ph.D. program is designed to train students at the Ph.D. level for research and applied research careers in developmental psychology. Students specialize in an area such as cognitive development, language, learning, executive function, social development, or developmental psychobiology and neuroscience.

There is a strong focus on research throughout the program, and students who find the best fit have a background in research and a strong interest in research at the doctoral level. Most graduates of the program take positions in academic or research settings.

Adviser and student at professional conference

Learn more and apply for admission

Follow these links (also in navigation on the left) to learn more about the program, our admission criteria, and how to apply.

Resources for current students

Follow this link to our current students page (also in navigation on left) to find information about program requirements. For handbooks, forms, and other resources, please visit the Grad Student Resources Site (requires login).

Questions?

Contact us at:

icdapply@umn.edu

Hear From Students

Featured Doctoral Students

Michelle Brown works to improve outcomes for victimized children and families

Amanda Hodel researches the neurobiology of child development

Camelia Hostinar studies how parents can help when things get scary.

Theresa Lafavor researches how children succeed in chaotic situations.

Lee Raby investigates how genes and environment interact in parent-child relationships.

Featured Alumni

Assistant Professor Janette Herbers conducts research to understand developmental processes of resilience in children who experience risks such as trauma, poverty, and homelessness.

Professor Brett Laurson explores adolescent relationships with parents and peers.

Michael Leimbach designs effective training for clients around the world.

Assistant Professor Rebecca Shlafer partnered with Sesame Street Workshop to lead the dissemination of new resources for children and families impacted by incarceration in Minnesota.

Assistant Professor Nim Tottenham examines the development of brain systems involved in human emotional development to understand how these systems are influenced by early adverse environments.

Kathryn Tout, co-director for Early Childhood Development and senior research scientist at Child Trends, directs research on programs and policies that support early childhood development.

Professor Carolyn Zahn-Waxler explores why some children seek to relieve others’ suffering.