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Recent Alumni

Jena DoomJena Doom, Ph.D.

Jena Doom completed her Ph.D. in developmental psychology at the Institute of Child Development in 2016. She is currently an NICHD postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan's Center for Human Growth and Development. Her research examines the effects of early adversity, nutrition, and social relationships on the stress system, immune system, cognition, behavior, and risk for later physical and mental health problems.


Camelia HostinarCamelia Hostinar, Ph.D.

Camelia graduated from the Gunnar Lab in August 2013, earning her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology (minor in Neuroscience) from the Institute of Child Development. During her doctoral work in the lab, she studied the role of early-life stress in shaping later stress reactivity, as well as social and cognitive development. Camelia is currently a postdoctoral scholar in the Institute for Policy Research and Center on Social Disparities and Health at Northwestern University.


Anna JohnsonAnna Johnson, Ph.D.

Anna completed her Ph.D. at the Institute of Child Development in 2013. She is currently a visiting assistant professor in the Psychology department at St. Olaf College. Her research focuses on the development of self-control in childhood and adolescence, particularly the relationship between stress and self-regulation at behavioral and biological levels. She also studies how mindfulness and yoga practice promote children’s ability to manage thoughts, emotions, and behavior.

 

 

 

Jamie Lawler, Ph.D.

Jamie completed her Ph.D. through the Developmental Psychopathology and Clinical Science Program at the Institute of Child Development in 2015. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Michigan. She recently completed her clinical internship at Hennepin County Medical Center. Jamie’s research interests focus on the social and emotional effects of early adversity and on interventions to promote positive development in high risk children. She has a particular interest in interventions to promote self-regulation including mindfulness-based interventions and parent-child preventative interventions. 


Clio Pitula, Ph.D.

Clio Pitula graduated from the Gunnar Lab in 2016, earning her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychopathology and Clinical Science from the Institute of Child Development. She is presently a post-doctoral fellow in the Pediatric Mental Health Institute at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Clio’s research focuses on the biological, cognitive, and social factors involved in predicting peer relationship functioning, particularly among children at high risk for social difficulties due to early life stress and/or mental health problems.