Thomas Stoffregen, PhD

Professor, Kinesiology

Areas of Interest: Perception and action, human factors, control of posture and orientation, ecological psychology, embodied cognition, coordination dynamics
Contact Information

224A Cooke Hall
1900 University Ave SE
Minneapolis, 55455
612-626-1056
tas@umn.edu
About
Current research interests

1. Perception and control of body orientation, and its integration with simultaneous suprapostural action. This research is carried out in the context of human-computer interaction and, separately, on the High Seas.  

2. Postural stability and motion sickness. This research is carried out in the context of contemporary technologies, such as virtual environements and tablet computers and, separately, on the High Seas. We recently have begun to investigate sex differences in susceptibility to motion sickness. Women are more susceptible than men, a fact that has social and political implications arising from the rapid spread of imaging technologies.

3. Perception and control of the dynamics of actor-environment systems (i.e., perception and exploitation of affordances).

Research funding

Dr. Stoffregen's research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Community. 

Broader impacts

Dr. Stoffregen's research has been profiled on Vox.com (2015), the BBC (2015), US News and World Report (2015), Wired (2015), in the New York Times (2013), the Wall Street Journal (2013), the Minneapolis Star-Tribune (2013) and Scientific American (2009). He has discussed his research on numerous radio broadcasts, including Marketplace Tech (2014), and on local TV and online video coverage. 

 
Education
  • Ph.D., human experimental psychology, Cornell University, 1984
  • B.A., psychology, with high honors, Oberlin College, 1979

Selected Publications
  1. Varlet, M., Bardy, B. G., Chen, F.-C., Alcantara, C., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2015). Coupling of postural activity with motion of a ship at sea. Experimental Brain Research, 233, 1607-1616.

  2. Stoffregen, T. A., & Mantel, B. (2015). Exploratory movement and affordances in design. Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing, 29, 257-265. 

  3. Munafo, J., Wade, M. G., Stergiou, N., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2015). Subjective reports and postural performance among older adult passengers on a sea voyage. Ecological Psychology, 27, 127-143.

  4. Mantel, B., Stoffregen, T. A. Campbell, A., & Bardy, B. G. (2015). Exploratory movement generates higher-order information that is sufficient for accurate perception of scaled egocentric distance. PLOS ONE, 10(4): e0120025. doi:10.1371/journal. pone.0120025.

  5. Haaland, E., Kaipust, J., Wang, Y., Stergiou, N., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2015). Human gait at sea while walking fore-aft versus athwart. Aerospace Medicine & Human Performance, 86, 435-439. 

  6. Chang, C.-H., Stergiou, N., Kaipust, J., Haaland, E., Wang, Y., Chen, F.-C., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2015). Walking before and during a sea voyage. Ecological Psychology, 27, 87-101.

  7. Koslucher, F. C., Haaland, E., Malsch, A., Webeler, J., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2015). Sex differences in the incidence of motion sickness induced by linear visual oscillation. Aviation Medicine and Human Performance, 86, 787-793.

  8. Varlet, M., Stoffregen, T. A., Chen, F.-C., Alcantara, C., Marin, L., & Bardy, B. G. (2014). Just the sight of you: Postural effects of interpersonal visual contact at sea. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 40, 2310-2318. doi 10.1037/a0038197

  9. Stoffregen, T. A., Chen, F.-C., Varlet, M., Alcantara, C., & Bardy, B. G. (2013). Getting your sea legs. PLOS ONE, 8(6), e66949. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0066949

  10. Stoffregen, T. A., Chen, Y.-C., & Koslucher, F. C. (2014). Motion control, motion sickness, and the postural dynamics of mobile devices. Experimental Brain Research, 232, 1389-1397. DOI 10.1007/s00221-014-3859-3.

  11. Chen, Y.-C., Tseng, T.-C., Hung, T.-H., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2014). Precursors of post-bout motion sickness in adolescent female boxers. Experimental Brain Research, 232, 2571-2579. DOI 10.1007/s00221-014-3910-4

  12. Mayo, A. M., Wade, M. G., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2011). Postural effects of the horizon on land and at sea. Psychological Science, 22, 118-124.

  13. Faugloire, E., Stoffregen, T. A., & Bardy, B. G. (2009). (De)Stabilization of required and spontaneous postural dynamics with learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 35, 170-187.

  14. Stoffregen, T. A., Villard, S., Kim, C., Ito, K., & Bardy, B. G. (2009). Coupling of head and body movement with motion of the audible environment. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception & Performance, 35, 1221-1231.

  15. Stoffregen, T. A., & Bardy, B. G. (2001). On specification and the senses. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 195-261.

  16. Stoffregen, T. A., & Riccio, G. E. (1988). An ecological theory of orientation and the vestibular system. Psychological Review, 95, 3-14.

Selected Presentations
  1. Stoffregen, T. A. (2014, November). Is motion sickness sexist? Talk presented at the University of Minnesota Department of Neuroscience.

  2. Koslucher, F. C., & Stoffregen, T. A. (2014, April). Sexual dimorphism may explain sex differences in susceptibility to motion sickness. Poster presented at a meeting of the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences, Minneapolis MN.

  3. Koslucher, Haaland, & Stoffregen, T. A. (2014, June). Sexual dimorphism in susceptibility to motion sickness. Poster presented at a meeting of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, Minneapolis MN.