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Courses at the Center for Spirituality and Healing

For information about enrollment in these courses as a registered student or a community member or for other related information, contact:        

Center for Spirituality and Healing.                                         

Mayo Memorial Building 5th floor, MMC #505                                                                    420 Delaware St. S.E.  Minneapolis, MN 55455

Telephone 612-624-9459

 

 

Forgiveness and Healing: A Journey Toward Wholeness                             

CSPH 5215       Spring Semester (Weekends)   Summer Session  (Week long format)       

Course Description

This course will examine the impact of forgiveness on the process of inter-personal and intra-personal healing, as well as healing of conflict and trauma at the inter-group level. Forgiveness and healing will be examined in the context of intense interpersonal and intra-personal conflicts in multiple health care and social work settings, including in families, between physicians and nurses, between patients/clients and nurses/social workers, within communities, among friends, between co-workers, or within ourselves. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the central elements of forgiveness and healing in the context of multiple health care and social work settings. The concepts of forgiveness and healing will be examined from multiple spiritual and secular traditions. The underlying philosophical elements of forgiveness and healing will be critically assessed and beliefs and rituals from numerous indigenous and European traditions will be presented and examined. The focus will be upon gaining a more grounded understanding of the process of forgiveness and its potential impact upon emotional and relational healing. The concepts of forgiveness and healing will be addressed in a very broad and inclusive manner, with no assumptions made related to their specific cultural context or meaning. Empirical studies that have examined the impact of forgiveness upon emotional and physical healing will be reviewed. Concepts such as forgiveness and healing are inseparable from the concept of spirituality. For the purposes of the course, spirituality is not synonymous with the dogma and creeds of the major religious traditions in the world, even though religion for many may serve as a pathway to spirituality. Practices within the major religions of the world that foster forgiveness and healing, however, will be explored, along with practices within Native American, Canadian Aboriginal, Native Hawaiian, African, New Zealand Maori, and Eastern cultural traditions.

Learning objectives At the conclusion of the course, students will have:

Knowledge of the central elements of the concept of forgiveness from multiple spiritual and cultural contexts. Knowledge of the difference between “shallow” and authentic forgiveness. An understanding of the central elements of the concept of healing from multiple spiritual and cultural contexts. An understanding of the difference between healing and curing. Knowledge of the positive impact that authentic forgiveness can have on the process of healing from all forms of micro and macro conflict and trauma. Knowledge of the role that forgiveness and healing through engaged spirituality (not necessarily religion) can play within the context of intense micro and macro level conflicts that nurses and social workers are faced with in multiple settings. An understanding of forgiveness and healing in terms of both interpersonal conflict and broader issues of social justice. An understanding of specific practices, such as mindfulness meditation, that contribute to forgiveness and healing that are grounded in diverse cultural traditions among indigenous people of the world. Knowledge of the contribution found within nursing and social work literal- to understanding forgiveness and healing in multiple practice settings. An ability to practice techniques which contribute to forgiveness and healing within the context of issues that students are faced with in multiple settings.

Course Format This course will be highly experiential, consisting of talking circles, small group work, mini-lectures, role plays, video presentations, and discussion. Students will be engaged in a dialogue with guest speakers from diverse spiritual and cultural traditions. The course will make frequent use of the sharing/healing circle format that is deeply rooted in Native American tradition. Rituals that relate to forgiveness and healing from other spiritual traditions will also be presented and experienced.

 

Peacemaking and Spirituality: A Journey Toward Healing & Strength      

CSPH 5211        Fall Semester  (Weekends)  Summer Session  (Week long format) 

Course Description

This course will examine the influence of spirituality upon the process of resolving conflict and making peace in the context of intense inter-personal and intra-personal conflicts in multiple health care and social work settings, including in families, between patients/clients and nurses/social workers, within communities, among friends, between co-workers, or within ourselves. During the past two decades, the field of conflict resolution and mediation has grown extensively in multiple settings throughout North America and Europe. Whereas conflict resolution theory and practice focuses upon a problem solving model to address the presenting dispute, peacemaking addresses conflict at a much deeper level. Peacemaking is based on a humanistic and transformative theory of conflict which draws heavily upon core values of nursing and social work, as well as the ancient wisdom and practices of many diverse indigenous cultures throughout the world. Within the context of these traditions, true peacemaking is inseparable from spirituality, from honoring the sacred and recognizing our interconnectedness. For the purposes of the course, spirituality is not synonymous with the dogma and creeds of the major religious traditions in the world, even though religion for many may serve as a pathway to spirituality. Practices within the major religions of the world that foster peacemaking, however, will be explored, along with practices within Native American, Canadian Aboriginal, Native Hawaiian, African, New Zealand Maori, and Eastern cultural traditions. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the central elements of peacemaking and spirituality in the context of multiple health care and social work settings.

Learning objectives At the conclusion of the course, students will have:

Knowledge of the difference between resolving disputes and making peace between individuals in conflict or within one’s self within the context of intense conflicts that one is faced with in multiple settings. Knowledge of the role of engaged spirituality (not religion) in achieving peace within the context of intense micro and macro level conflicts that one is faced with in multiple settings. Understanding of peacemaking and engaged spirituality in terms of both interpersonal conflict and broader issues of social justice. Understanding of practices that contribute to peacemaking and spirituality that are grounded in diverse cultural traditions among indigenous people of the world. Understanding the strengths and significant limitations of the dominant theory and practice of conflict resolution and mediation in Western European culture. An awareness of the contribution found within social science and health care literature to understanding peacemaking and spirituality in multiple practice settings. An awareness of how the principles of peacemaking and spirituality that are grounded in non-western traditions can be adapted for use within Western European culture. Ability to practice techniques which contribute to peacemaking and spirituality within the context of intense conflicts that one is faced with in multiple settings.

Course Format This course will be highly experiential, consisting of talking circles, small group work, mini-lectures, role plays, video presentations, and discussion. Students will be engaged in a dialogue with guest speakers from diverse spiritual and cultural traditions, including possible representatives from Buddhism, Hinduism, Native American, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. The course will make frequent use of the sharing/healing circle format that is deeply rooted in Native American tradition. Rituals that relate to peacemaking from other spiritual traditions will also be presented and experienced.